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Vol 49, No 5 (2017)
Special articles
Published online: 2017-12-28
Submitted: 2017-10-30
Accepted: 2017-12-03
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Unanticipated difficult airway management in children — the consensus statement of the Paediatric Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Section and the Airway Management Section of the Polish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy and the Polish So

Wojciech Walas, Dawid Aleksandrowicz, Maria Borszewska-Kornacka, Tomasz Gaszyński, Ewa Helwich, Marek Migdał, Andrzej Piotrowski, Grażyna Siejka, Tomasz Szczapa, Alicja Bartkowska-Śniatkowska
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2017.0079
·
Pubmed: 29286529
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(5):336-349.

open access

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)
Special articles
Published online: 2017-12-28
Submitted: 2017-10-30
Accepted: 2017-12-03

Abstract

Tracheal intubation may be defined as an artificial airway established in order to provide mechanical ventilation of the lungs during surgical procedures under general anaesthesia, treatment in an intensive care unit, as well as in emergency situations. Difficulties encountered during intubation may cause hypoxia, hypoxic brain injury and, in extreme situations, may result in the patient’s death. There may be unanticipated and anticipated difficult airway. Children form a specific group of patients as there are significant differences in both anatomy and physiology. There are some limitations in equipment used for the airway management in children. There are only few paediatric difficult airway guidelines available, some of which have significant limitations. The presented algorithm was created by a group of specialists who represent the Polish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, as well as the Polish Neonatology Society. This algorithm is intended for the unanticipated difficult airway in children and can be used in all age groups. It covers both elective intubation, as well as rescue techniques. A guide forms an integral part of the algorithm. It describes in detail all stages of the algorithm considering some modifications in a specific age group, e.g. neonates. The main aim of Stage I is to optimise conditions for face mask ventilation, laryngoscopy and intubation. Stage IIA focuses on maximising the chances of successful intubation when face mask ventilation is possible. Stage IIB outlines actions aimed at improving face mask ventilation. Stage IIIA describes the use of a SAD (Supraglottic Airway Device) during effective face mask ventilation or in a CICV (Cannot Intubate, Cannot Ventilate) situation. Stage IIIB outlines intubation through a SAD. Stage IV describes rescue techniques and outlines possible options of either proceeding with surgery or postponing it, depending on clinical situation.

Abstract

Tracheal intubation may be defined as an artificial airway established in order to provide mechanical ventilation of the lungs during surgical procedures under general anaesthesia, treatment in an intensive care unit, as well as in emergency situations. Difficulties encountered during intubation may cause hypoxia, hypoxic brain injury and, in extreme situations, may result in the patient’s death. There may be unanticipated and anticipated difficult airway. Children form a specific group of patients as there are significant differences in both anatomy and physiology. There are some limitations in equipment used for the airway management in children. There are only few paediatric difficult airway guidelines available, some of which have significant limitations. The presented algorithm was created by a group of specialists who represent the Polish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, as well as the Polish Neonatology Society. This algorithm is intended for the unanticipated difficult airway in children and can be used in all age groups. It covers both elective intubation, as well as rescue techniques. A guide forms an integral part of the algorithm. It describes in detail all stages of the algorithm considering some modifications in a specific age group, e.g. neonates. The main aim of Stage I is to optimise conditions for face mask ventilation, laryngoscopy and intubation. Stage IIA focuses on maximising the chances of successful intubation when face mask ventilation is possible. Stage IIB outlines actions aimed at improving face mask ventilation. Stage IIIA describes the use of a SAD (Supraglottic Airway Device) during effective face mask ventilation or in a CICV (Cannot Intubate, Cannot Ventilate) situation. Stage IIIB outlines intubation through a SAD. Stage IV describes rescue techniques and outlines possible options of either proceeding with surgery or postponing it, depending on clinical situation.
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Keywords

difficult airway, difficult intubation, child, algorithm

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About this article
Title

Unanticipated difficult airway management in children — the consensus statement of the Paediatric Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Section and the Airway Management Section of the Polish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy and the Polish So

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)

Pages

336-349

Published online

2017-12-28

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2017.0079

Pubmed

29286529

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(5):336-349.

Keywords

difficult airway
difficult intubation
child
algorithm

Authors

Wojciech Walas
Dawid Aleksandrowicz
Maria Borszewska-Kornacka
Tomasz Gaszyński
Ewa Helwich
Marek Migdał
Andrzej Piotrowski
Grażyna Siejka
Tomasz Szczapa
Alicja Bartkowska-Śniatkowska

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