open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
Research paper
Submitted: 2020-08-07
Accepted: 2020-09-08
Published online: 2020-11-12
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Knowledge, anxiety and the use of hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis among health care students and professionals regarding COVID-19 pandemic

Vinita Jindal1, Saurabh Mittal2, Tanvir Kaur1, Avtar Singh Bansal1, Prabhjot Kaur1, Gurmeet Kaur1, Hem C Sati3, Avneet Garg1
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0163
·
Pubmed: 33393644
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):520-530.
Affiliations
  1. Adesh Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Bathinda, Punjab, India
  2. All India Institute of Medical Scieneces, New Delhi, India
  3. All India Institute of Medical Scieneces, New Delhi, India

open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2020-08-07
Accepted: 2020-09-08
Published online: 2020-11-12

Abstract

Introduction:  Data regarding knowledge and attitude about COVID-19, the prevalence of acceptance of hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis and anxiety amidst COVID-19 pandemic among health care students/professionals in India is scarce.
Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during May 2020, using an online survey via Google forms. A self-administered validated structured questionnaire was applied, which comprised 28 questions among health care students/professionals at a tertiary care centrein North India.
Results: A total of 956 respondents were included (10.2% nurses, 45.2% medical students, 24.3% paramedical students, 11.7% resident doctors and 8.6% consultant doctors). Overall knowledge score was 9.3/15; the highest for preventive practices (4/5), followed by clinical knowledge (2.7/5) and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) (2.6/5). The overall score was the highest in consultant doctors (10.8) while the lowest in nurses (8.5) and paramedical students (8.4) (p < 0.001). Less than half of the respondents had knowledge about the correct sequence of doffing PPE and the use of N95 mask. About 21.8% of the participants experienced moderate to severe anxiety; higher among nurses (38%), followed by paramedical students (29.3%); and anxiety was higher when knowledge score was low (27.6% vs 14.7%); both factors were independent predictors on multivariate analysis (p < 0.001). Only 18.1% of the respondents applied HCQ prophylaxis — the highest proportion constituted consultants (42.7%), and the least — paramedical students (5.2%); (p < 0.001) and HCQ use was more frequently used if they had a family member of extreme age group at home (23.3% vs 12.2%; p < 0.001).
Conclusions: The knowledge about correct PPE usage is low among all groups of HCWs and students, and there is a high prevalence of anxiety due to COVID-19. The lower COVID-19 knowledge scores were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of anxiety and inadequate use of HCQ prophylaxis. The appliance of HCQ prophylaxis had no significant association with anxiety levels of the respondents.

Abstract

Introduction:  Data regarding knowledge and attitude about COVID-19, the prevalence of acceptance of hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis and anxiety amidst COVID-19 pandemic among health care students/professionals in India is scarce.
Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during May 2020, using an online survey via Google forms. A self-administered validated structured questionnaire was applied, which comprised 28 questions among health care students/professionals at a tertiary care centrein North India.
Results: A total of 956 respondents were included (10.2% nurses, 45.2% medical students, 24.3% paramedical students, 11.7% resident doctors and 8.6% consultant doctors). Overall knowledge score was 9.3/15; the highest for preventive practices (4/5), followed by clinical knowledge (2.7/5) and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) (2.6/5). The overall score was the highest in consultant doctors (10.8) while the lowest in nurses (8.5) and paramedical students (8.4) (p < 0.001). Less than half of the respondents had knowledge about the correct sequence of doffing PPE and the use of N95 mask. About 21.8% of the participants experienced moderate to severe anxiety; higher among nurses (38%), followed by paramedical students (29.3%); and anxiety was higher when knowledge score was low (27.6% vs 14.7%); both factors were independent predictors on multivariate analysis (p < 0.001). Only 18.1% of the respondents applied HCQ prophylaxis — the highest proportion constituted consultants (42.7%), and the least — paramedical students (5.2%); (p < 0.001) and HCQ use was more frequently used if they had a family member of extreme age group at home (23.3% vs 12.2%; p < 0.001).
Conclusions: The knowledge about correct PPE usage is low among all groups of HCWs and students, and there is a high prevalence of anxiety due to COVID-19. The lower COVID-19 knowledge scores were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of anxiety and inadequate use of HCQ prophylaxis. The appliance of HCQ prophylaxis had no significant association with anxiety levels of the respondents.

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Keywords

COVID-19; HCQ prophylaxis; anxiety

About this article
Title

Knowledge, anxiety and the use of hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis among health care students and professionals regarding COVID-19 pandemic

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

520-530

Published online

2020-11-12

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0163

Pubmed

33393644

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):520-530.

Keywords

COVID-19
HCQ prophylaxis
anxiety

Authors

Vinita Jindal
Saurabh Mittal
Tanvir Kaur
Avtar Singh Bansal
Prabhjot Kaur
Gurmeet Kaur
Hem C Sati
Avneet Garg

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