open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2020)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2020-08-31
Submitted: 2020-06-26
Accepted: 2020-08-03
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Ageing, sex, obesity, smoking and COVID-19 — truths, myths and speculations

Adam Jerzy Białas, Anna Kumor-Kisielewska, Paweł Górski
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2020.0133
·
Pubmed: 32869267
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(4):335-342.

open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2020)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2020-08-31
Submitted: 2020-06-26
Accepted: 2020-08-03

Abstract

In early December 2019, in the city of Wuhan in Hubei Province, China, the first infections by a novel coronavirus were reported. Since then, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been spreading to other cities and countries becoming the global emerging epidemiological issue and quickly reaching the status of a pandemic. Multiple risk factors of disease severity and mortality have been identified so far. These include old age, male sex, smoking, and obesity. This concise narrative review highlights the important role of these factors in the pathobiology and clinical landscape of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). We especially focused on their significant role in disease severity and mortality. However, in spite of intensive research, most of the presented pieces of evidence are weak and need further verification.

Abstract

In early December 2019, in the city of Wuhan in Hubei Province, China, the first infections by a novel coronavirus were reported. Since then, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been spreading to other cities and countries becoming the global emerging epidemiological issue and quickly reaching the status of a pandemic. Multiple risk factors of disease severity and mortality have been identified so far. These include old age, male sex, smoking, and obesity. This concise narrative review highlights the important role of these factors in the pathobiology and clinical landscape of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). We especially focused on their significant role in disease severity and mortality. However, in spite of intensive research, most of the presented pieces of evidence are weak and need further verification.

Get Citation

Keywords

coronavirus infection; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; morbidity; mortality

About this article
Title

Ageing, sex, obesity, smoking and COVID-19 — truths, myths and speculations

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 4 (2020)

Pages

335-342

Published online

2020-08-31

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2020.0133

Pubmed

32869267

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(4):335-342.

Keywords

coronavirus infection
SARS-CoV-2
COVID-19
morbidity
mortality

Authors

Adam Jerzy Białas
Anna Kumor-Kisielewska
Paweł Górski

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