open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)
Case report
Submitted: 2020-06-12
Accepted: 2020-07-30
Published online: 2021-01-29
Get Citation

Emphysema as a possible complication of infant respiratory distress syndrome leading to lung transplantation

Fryderyk Zawadzki1, Marta Wajda-Pokrontka1, Tomasz Stącel1, Maciej Urlik1, Mirosław Nęcki1, Remigiusz Antończyk1, Magdalena Latos1, Maria Królikowska1, Damian Maruszak1, Marcelina Łazaj1, Małgorzata Kowacka1, Alina Kliczka1, Marian Zembala1, Marek Ochman1
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0174
·
Pubmed: 33559118
·
Adv Respir Med 2021;89(2):211-215.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Cardiac, Vascular and Endovascular Surgery and Transplantology, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases, Zabrze, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2020-06-12
Accepted: 2020-07-30
Published online: 2021-01-29

Abstract

Infant respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS) develops among premature infants due to structural immaturity of the lungs and insufficient production of pulmonary surfactant. Nowadays, treatment takes place under conditions of intensive care and includes oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, exogenous supplementation of pulmonary surfactant and antenatal corticosteroid therapy. The treatment of IRDS, especially mechanical ventilation, may lead to complications which can contribute to developing a severe dysfunction of the respiratory system. Unavailability of pharmacological treatment of IRDS and development of pulmonary barotrauma due to mechanical ventilation in our patient led to the forming of severe pulmonary interstitial emphysema. In this case report, lung transplantation was performed as an only successful therapeutic option.

Abstract

Infant respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS) develops among premature infants due to structural immaturity of the lungs and insufficient production of pulmonary surfactant. Nowadays, treatment takes place under conditions of intensive care and includes oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, exogenous supplementation of pulmonary surfactant and antenatal corticosteroid therapy. The treatment of IRDS, especially mechanical ventilation, may lead to complications which can contribute to developing a severe dysfunction of the respiratory system. Unavailability of pharmacological treatment of IRDS and development of pulmonary barotrauma due to mechanical ventilation in our patient led to the forming of severe pulmonary interstitial emphysema. In this case report, lung transplantation was performed as an only successful therapeutic option.

Get Citation

Keywords

IRDS; pulmonary surfactant; pulmonary barotrauma; pulmonary interstitial emphysema; lung transplantation

About this article
Title

Emphysema as a possible complication of infant respiratory distress syndrome leading to lung transplantation

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)

Article type

Case report

Pages

211-215

Published online

2021-01-29

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0174

Pubmed

33559118

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2021;89(2):211-215.

Keywords

IRDS
pulmonary surfactant
pulmonary barotrauma
pulmonary interstitial emphysema
lung transplantation

Authors

Fryderyk Zawadzki
Marta Wajda-Pokrontka
Tomasz Stącel
Maciej Urlik
Mirosław Nęcki
Remigiusz Antończyk
Magdalena Latos
Maria Królikowska
Damian Maruszak
Marcelina Łazaj
Małgorzata Kowacka
Alina Kliczka
Marian Zembala
Marek Ochman

References (16)
  1. Hibbard JU, Wilkins I, Sun L, et al. Respiratory morbidity in late preterm births. JAMA. 2010; 304(4): 419–425.
  2. Avery ME. Surfactant deficiency in hyaline membrane disease: the story of discovery. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000; 161(4 Pt 1): 1074–1075.
  3. Fujiwara T, Maeta H, Chida S, et al. Artificial surfactant therapy in hyaline-membrane disease. Lancet. 1980; 1(8159): 55–59.
  4. Hintz SR, Poole WK, Wright LL, et al. Changes in mortality and morbidities among infants born at less than 25 weeks during the post-surfactant era. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2005; 90(2): F128–F133.
  5. Finer N, Leone T. Oxygen saturation monitoring for the preterm infant: the evidence basis for current practice. Pediatr Res. 2009; 65(4): 375–380.
  6. Sivit CJ. Diagnostic imaging. In: Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC (ed). Neonatal — erinatal medicine: diseases of the fetus and newborn, Philadelhia, Mosby. 2007: 713–731.
  7. Verma RP, Chandra S, Niwas R, et al. Risk factors and clinical outcomes of pulmonary interstitial emphysema in extremely low birth weight infants. J Perinatol. 2006; 26(3): 197–200.
  8. Morley CJ. Systematic review of prophylactic vs rescue surfactant. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 1997; 77(1): F70–F74.
  9. Cross AS, Roup B. Role of respiratory assistance devices in endemic nosocomial pneumonia. Am J Med. 1981; 70(3): 681–685.
  10. Donn SM, Sinha SK. Minimising ventilator induced lung injury in preterm infants. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2006; 91(3): F226–F230.
  11. Klingenberg C, Wheeler KI, McCallion N, et al. Volume-targeted versus pressure-limited ventilation in neonates. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017; 10: CD003666.
  12. Avery CM, Liggins GC, Howie RN. A controlled trial of antepartum glucocorticoid treatment for prevention of the respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. Pediatrics. 1972; 50(4): 515–525.
  13. Roberts D, Brown J, Medley N, et al. Antenatal corticosteroids for accelerating fetal lung maturation for women at risk of preterm birth. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017; 3: CD004454.
  14. Suresh GK, Soll RF. Overview of surfactant replacement trials. J Perinatol. 2005; 25 Suppl 2: S40–S44.
  15. Committee on Fetus and Newborn, American Academy of Pediatrics. Respiratory support in preterm infants at birth. Pediatrics. 2014; 133(1): 171–174.
  16. Bahadue FL, Soll R. Early versus delayed selective surfactant treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012; 11: CD001456.

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Czasopismo Pneumonologia i Alergologia Polska dostęne jest również w Ikamed - księgarnia medyczna

Wydawcą serwisu jest "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl