open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
Research paper
Submitted: 2020-05-18
Accepted: 2020-07-22
Published online: 2020-11-01
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Effects on vital signs after twenty minutes of vaping compared to people exposed to second-hand vapor

Molly L McClelland1, Channing S Sesoko1, Douglas A MacDonald1, Louis M Davis1
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0148
·
Pubmed: 33393642
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):504-514.
Affiliations
  1. University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, United States

open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2020-05-18
Accepted: 2020-07-22
Published online: 2020-11-01

Abstract

Introduction: Very little is known about the immediate physiological implications of vaping or inhaling second-hand vapor. This study used a quantitative approach to understand the short-term physiological implications of vape use and exposure to sec-ond-hand vapor for people who do not vape.
Material and methods: One hundred and forty-eight people participated in the study, 75 self-identified as non-vapers and 73 self-identified as people who vape. All participants were over the age of 18. Participants used or were exposed to non-flavored e-juice without nicotine in Sorin® vape devices. Heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, blood oxygenation, blood glucose and pulmonary function tests were assessed. Physiological parameters were assessed prior to vape use or exposure to vapor and again after 20 minutes of vaping.
Results: Findings indicated there were no significant changes in most health parameters except blood pressure which was reduced in both groups. Heart rate was also significantly reduced for vaping participants.
Conclusion: Vaping without flavorings or nicotine do not appear to have an immediate negative health impact on vital signs. The physiological effects of long-term exposure and/or vape use requires additional investigation. Information was established regarding the physiological effects of non-flavored, non-nicotine vaping so future studies can compare the effects of vaping with assorted flavors and nicotine concentrations to the effects of vaping only the base ingredients (vegetable glycerin and propylene glycol). New knowledge was gleaned relating to exposure to vapor, a phenomenon not previously examined but common espe-cially among non-vaping people who attend social events where people are vaping.

Abstract

Introduction: Very little is known about the immediate physiological implications of vaping or inhaling second-hand vapor. This study used a quantitative approach to understand the short-term physiological implications of vape use and exposure to sec-ond-hand vapor for people who do not vape.
Material and methods: One hundred and forty-eight people participated in the study, 75 self-identified as non-vapers and 73 self-identified as people who vape. All participants were over the age of 18. Participants used or were exposed to non-flavored e-juice without nicotine in Sorin® vape devices. Heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, blood oxygenation, blood glucose and pulmonary function tests were assessed. Physiological parameters were assessed prior to vape use or exposure to vapor and again after 20 minutes of vaping.
Results: Findings indicated there were no significant changes in most health parameters except blood pressure which was reduced in both groups. Heart rate was also significantly reduced for vaping participants.
Conclusion: Vaping without flavorings or nicotine do not appear to have an immediate negative health impact on vital signs. The physiological effects of long-term exposure and/or vape use requires additional investigation. Information was established regarding the physiological effects of non-flavored, non-nicotine vaping so future studies can compare the effects of vaping with assorted flavors and nicotine concentrations to the effects of vaping only the base ingredients (vegetable glycerin and propylene glycol). New knowledge was gleaned relating to exposure to vapor, a phenomenon not previously examined but common espe-cially among non-vaping people who attend social events where people are vaping.

Get Citation

Keywords

vaping; second-hand vapor; e-cigarettes; e-juice; vital signs

About this article
Title

Effects on vital signs after twenty minutes of vaping compared to people exposed to second-hand vapor

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

504-514

Published online

2020-11-01

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0148

Pubmed

33393642

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):504-514.

Keywords

vaping
second-hand vapor
e-cigarettes
e-juice
vital signs

Authors

Molly L McClelland
Channing S Sesoko
Douglas A MacDonald
Louis M Davis

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