open access

Vol 78, No 4 (2010)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2010-07-08
Submitted: 2013-02-22
Get Citation

Is prediction of the allergic march possible on the basis of nasal cytology?

Zygmunt Nowacki, Jolanta Neuberg, Krystyna Strzałka, Magdalena Szczepanik, Renata Szczepanik, Henryk Mazurek
Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2010;78(4):263-270.

open access

Vol 78, No 4 (2010)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2010-07-08
Submitted: 2013-02-22

Abstract


Introduction: The term allergic march has been used to describe natural evolution of the atopic disease in children, accompanied by the change in organ manifestation with time. The aim of the study was to analyze the role of the cellular components of the nasal cytology as a tool for prediction of atopic diseases and clinical symptoms preceding allergic march.
Material and methods: In a retrospective manner out of a group of 1620 children, 146 symptomatic children (60 girls and 86 boys) meeting inclusion criteria (age below 4 years at first visit, symptoms suggesting allergy, nasal cytology performed at the beginning of observation, observation of at least 4 years) were included in analysis.
Results: Mean age of children at time of enrollment was 27 months (SD 10 months). After 4 years allergic rhinitis (AR) was diagnosed in 85 children (58.2%), atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) in 51 (34.9%) and asthma in 48 (32.9%). Nonallergic etiology was identified in 36 patients (22.5%). All patients with asthma suffered from AR. Significant differences between groups were found in number of eosinophils (p < 0.001), neutrophils (p < 0.001), and lymphocytes (p = 0.028) in cytological examination of nasal mucosa. In children with AR (alone or combined with other comorbidities) nasal eosinophilia was higher than in children with AEDS (18% v. 3%; p = 0.004) or non-allergic disease (18% v. 4%; p < 0.001). Nasal eosinophilia of at least 8% was predictive for development of AR (sensitivity 80%, specificity 95%).
Conclusions: In children below 4 years nasal eosinophilia &#8805; 8% was predictive for AR development. Allergic march was observed in children with AEDS or/and gastrointestinal allergy symptoms present at the beginning of observation. Nasal eosinophilia in small children might be predictive for the risk of allergic march.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2010; 78, 4: 263-270

Abstract


Introduction: The term allergic march has been used to describe natural evolution of the atopic disease in children, accompanied by the change in organ manifestation with time. The aim of the study was to analyze the role of the cellular components of the nasal cytology as a tool for prediction of atopic diseases and clinical symptoms preceding allergic march.
Material and methods: In a retrospective manner out of a group of 1620 children, 146 symptomatic children (60 girls and 86 boys) meeting inclusion criteria (age below 4 years at first visit, symptoms suggesting allergy, nasal cytology performed at the beginning of observation, observation of at least 4 years) were included in analysis.
Results: Mean age of children at time of enrollment was 27 months (SD 10 months). After 4 years allergic rhinitis (AR) was diagnosed in 85 children (58.2%), atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) in 51 (34.9%) and asthma in 48 (32.9%). Nonallergic etiology was identified in 36 patients (22.5%). All patients with asthma suffered from AR. Significant differences between groups were found in number of eosinophils (p < 0.001), neutrophils (p < 0.001), and lymphocytes (p = 0.028) in cytological examination of nasal mucosa. In children with AR (alone or combined with other comorbidities) nasal eosinophilia was higher than in children with AEDS (18% v. 3%; p = 0.004) or non-allergic disease (18% v. 4%; p < 0.001). Nasal eosinophilia of at least 8% was predictive for development of AR (sensitivity 80%, specificity 95%).
Conclusions: In children below 4 years nasal eosinophilia &#8805; 8% was predictive for AR development. Allergic march was observed in children with AEDS or/and gastrointestinal allergy symptoms present at the beginning of observation. Nasal eosinophilia in small children might be predictive for the risk of allergic march.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2010; 78, 4: 263-270
Get Citation

Keywords

nasal cytology; allergic march; allergic rhinitis; asthma

About this article
Title

Is prediction of the allergic march possible on the basis of nasal cytology?

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 78, No 4 (2010)

Pages

263-270

Published online

2010-07-08

Bibliographic record

Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2010;78(4):263-270.

Keywords

nasal cytology
allergic march
allergic rhinitis
asthma

Authors

Zygmunt Nowacki
Jolanta Neuberg
Krystyna Strzałka
Magdalena Szczepanik
Renata Szczepanik
Henryk Mazurek

Important: This website uses cookies.tanya dokter More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Czasopismo Pneumonologia i Alergologia Polska dostęne jest również w Ikamed - księgarnia medyczna

Wydawcą serwisu jest "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl