open access

Vol 62, No 4 (2010)
MARITIME PSYCHOLOGY Original article
Published online: 2011-02-24
Submitted: 2013-02-18
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Shift work and age in petroleum offshore industry

Siri Waage, Stale Pallesen. Bente E Moen, BjØrn Bjorvatn
International Maritime Health 2010;62(4):251-257.

open access

Vol 62, No 4 (2010)
MARITIME PSYCHOLOGY Original article
Published online: 2011-02-24
Submitted: 2013-02-18

Abstract


Background. Shift work is associated with sleep and health problems. Tolerance to shift work is reported to decrease with age. Shift work tolerance should be considered in different shift work populations. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between age, shift work exposure, shift type, and morningness and sleep/health problems in oil rig shift workers.
Material and methods. A total of 199 workers participated. They worked either two weeks of 12-h day shifts (n = 96) or two weeks of swing shifts (n = 103) (one week of 12-h night shifts followed by one week of 12-h day shifts), followed by four weeks off work. The workers filled out questionnaires on demographics, work, sleep, and health.
Results. We found no significant associations between age or years of shift work exposure and any of the sleep, sleepiness, or health parameters. There was a significant association between shift type and sleep duration, showing that swing shift workers had longer sleep duration than day shift workers. In addition, we found a significant association between the interaction age*, shift type, and sleep duration, where sleep duration was negatively associated with age for the swing shift workers and positively associated with age for the day shift workers. There were significant associations between morningness and sleep latency, sleep efficiency, and insomnia.
Conclusions. Older workers may tolerate shift work well. Age, shift work exposure time, and shift type seemed not to affect shift work tolerance in this population. However, this may be due to a healthy worker effect and/or selection bias. (Int Marit Health 2010; 61; 4: 251-257)

Abstract


Background. Shift work is associated with sleep and health problems. Tolerance to shift work is reported to decrease with age. Shift work tolerance should be considered in different shift work populations. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between age, shift work exposure, shift type, and morningness and sleep/health problems in oil rig shift workers.
Material and methods. A total of 199 workers participated. They worked either two weeks of 12-h day shifts (n = 96) or two weeks of swing shifts (n = 103) (one week of 12-h night shifts followed by one week of 12-h day shifts), followed by four weeks off work. The workers filled out questionnaires on demographics, work, sleep, and health.
Results. We found no significant associations between age or years of shift work exposure and any of the sleep, sleepiness, or health parameters. There was a significant association between shift type and sleep duration, showing that swing shift workers had longer sleep duration than day shift workers. In addition, we found a significant association between the interaction age*, shift type, and sleep duration, where sleep duration was negatively associated with age for the swing shift workers and positively associated with age for the day shift workers. There were significant associations between morningness and sleep latency, sleep efficiency, and insomnia.
Conclusions. Older workers may tolerate shift work well. Age, shift work exposure time, and shift type seemed not to affect shift work tolerance in this population. However, this may be due to a healthy worker effect and/or selection bias. (Int Marit Health 2010; 61; 4: 251-257)
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Keywords

ageing; morningness; health; shift work; shift work tolerance

About this article
Title

Shift work and age in petroleum offshore industry

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 62, No 4 (2010)

Pages

251-257

Published online

2011-02-24

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2010;62(4):251-257.

Keywords

ageing
morningness
health
shift work
shift work tolerance

Authors

Siri Waage
Stale Pallesen. Bente E Moen
BjØrn Bjorvatn

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