open access

Vol 13, No 6 (2018)
Electrotherapy
Published online: 2019-03-04
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Phrenic nerve stimulation for treatment of central sleep apnea in patients with heart failure

Dariusz Jagielski, Waldemar Banasiak, Piotr Ponikowski
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2018.0119
·
Folia Cardiologica 2018;13(6):581-587.

open access

Vol 13, No 6 (2018)
Electrotherapy
Published online: 2019-03-04

Abstract

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is characterised by a cessation of airflow in the respiratory airways during sleep due to fluctuations
in respiratory drive accompanied by a cessation of respiratory muscle activity. Patients with CSA often have
a Cheyne-Stokes respiration. CSA occurs in patients with various diseases including patients with heart failure (HF).
It can lead to many unfavourable phenomena associated with sympathetic nervous system activation and increased
mortality. Continuous positive airway pressure and other methods are used in the treatment of CSA. Recently, a new
method has been developed that features stimulation of the phrenic nerve. This leads to contractions of the diaphragm
and to regulation of the breathing pattern. The following paper presents the current state of knowledge on stimulation of
the phrenic nerve, and its impact on respiratory parameters, physical performance and quality of life in patients with HF.

Abstract

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is characterised by a cessation of airflow in the respiratory airways during sleep due to fluctuations
in respiratory drive accompanied by a cessation of respiratory muscle activity. Patients with CSA often have
a Cheyne-Stokes respiration. CSA occurs in patients with various diseases including patients with heart failure (HF).
It can lead to many unfavourable phenomena associated with sympathetic nervous system activation and increased
mortality. Continuous positive airway pressure and other methods are used in the treatment of CSA. Recently, a new
method has been developed that features stimulation of the phrenic nerve. This leads to contractions of the diaphragm
and to regulation of the breathing pattern. The following paper presents the current state of knowledge on stimulation of
the phrenic nerve, and its impact on respiratory parameters, physical performance and quality of life in patients with HF.

Get Citation

Keywords

central sleep apnea, phrenic nerve stimulation, heart failure

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About this article
Title

Phrenic nerve stimulation for treatment of central sleep apnea in patients with heart failure

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 13, No 6 (2018)

Pages

581-587

Published online

2019-03-04

DOI

10.5603/FC.2018.0119

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2018;13(6):581-587.

Keywords

central sleep apnea
phrenic nerve stimulation
heart failure

Authors

Dariusz Jagielski
Waldemar Banasiak
Piotr Ponikowski

References (24)
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