open access

Vol 4, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-11-13
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Emergency healthcare providers perception of workplace dangers in the polish Emergency Medical Service: a multi-centre survey study

Tomasz Kłosiewicz, Radosław Zalewski, Marek Dąbrowski, Karolina Kłosiewicz, Andrzej Rut, Maciej Sip, Agata Dąbrowska, Michał Mandecki, Radosław Stec, Michał Nowicki, Łukasz Szarpak
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.a2019.0030
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Disaster Emerg Med J 2019;4(4):166-172.

open access

Vol 4, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-11-13

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: There are many risk factors that account for hazards in paramedics’ and ambulance nurses’ profession. Driving a vehicle, having contact with patients, making difficult medical decisions, doing night shifts and working in a stressful environment, all of those features negatively affect their health. The aim of the study was to evaluate paramedics’ and ambulance nurses attitude towards personal safety, to assess their subjective feeling of danger, as well as identify types of hazards they experience.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out via a diagnostic survey method, an anonymous questionnaire. Among 572 responders there were nurses and paramedics, who work in non-physician medical rescue teams in Poland.

RESULTS: Most of the surveyed medics (40.5%) have rated the level of danger of their occupation to 4 on a scale from 1 to 5, with the greatest hazard being posed by patients under the influence of designer drugs. As many as 43% of medics have had back-related problems and 41% have suffered injuries at work. Notwithstanding, a majority of respondents have admitted that if they could plan their career again, they would choose the same profession.

CONCLUSIONS: Prehospital healthcare providers have generally rated their work as dangerous. More attention should be paid to teach first responders how to deal with aggression and how to handle stress. Efforts should be made to increase paramedics’ and nurses’ awareness about health problems related to shift work.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: There are many risk factors that account for hazards in paramedics’ and ambulance nurses’ profession. Driving a vehicle, having contact with patients, making difficult medical decisions, doing night shifts and working in a stressful environment, all of those features negatively affect their health. The aim of the study was to evaluate paramedics’ and ambulance nurses attitude towards personal safety, to assess their subjective feeling of danger, as well as identify types of hazards they experience.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out via a diagnostic survey method, an anonymous questionnaire. Among 572 responders there were nurses and paramedics, who work in non-physician medical rescue teams in Poland.

RESULTS: Most of the surveyed medics (40.5%) have rated the level of danger of their occupation to 4 on a scale from 1 to 5, with the greatest hazard being posed by patients under the influence of designer drugs. As many as 43% of medics have had back-related problems and 41% have suffered injuries at work. Notwithstanding, a majority of respondents have admitted that if they could plan their career again, they would choose the same profession.

CONCLUSIONS: Prehospital healthcare providers have generally rated their work as dangerous. More attention should be paid to teach first responders how to deal with aggression and how to handle stress. Efforts should be made to increase paramedics’ and nurses’ awareness about health problems related to shift work.

Get Citation

Keywords

workplace violence; occupational risk factors; occupational stress; Emergency Medical Services; prehospital care; workplace safety

About this article
Title

Emergency healthcare providers perception of workplace dangers in the polish Emergency Medical Service: a multi-centre survey study

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 4, No 4 (2019)

Pages

166-172

Published online

2019-11-13

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.a2019.0030

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2019;4(4):166-172.

Keywords

workplace violence
occupational risk factors
occupational stress
Emergency Medical Services
prehospital care
workplace safety

Authors

Tomasz Kłosiewicz
Radosław Zalewski
Marek Dąbrowski
Karolina Kłosiewicz
Andrzej Rut
Maciej Sip
Agata Dąbrowska
Michał Mandecki
Radosław Stec
Michał Nowicki
Łukasz Szarpak

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