open access

Vol 12, No 2 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-06-06
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What do students know about the use of opioids in the treatment of chronic cancer-related pain

Monika Rucińska, Anna Kieszkowska-Grudny, Anna Sugajska, Karolina Osowiecka, Anna Siwy-Hudowska
Palliat Med Pract 2018;12(2):106-117.

open access

Vol 12, No 2 (2018)
Original articles
Published online: 2018-06-06

Abstract

Background. Pain occurs in the majority of patients with cancer. Approximately 75% of patients requires administration of opioids. The aim of the study was to evaluate the students’ knowledge about the use of opioids in the treatment of cancer pain.

Material and methods. The study included 167 students in different divisions. The questionnaire prepared for this study was used.

Results. 2/3 of students agreed with the statement that, in the case of chronic pain, opioids used at regular intervals are better than feeding them when pain occurs. 1/4 of respondents thought that before you give another dose of a painkiller, a patient should feel the pain. Students of the medical division more often than students of other divisions gave correct answers to questions about the route of administration and the need to use opioids at regular intervals, without having to wait for pain. More than half of all students believed that increasing doses of painkillers may mean that the patient becomes addicted to opioids. On the question whether it may be useful to provide the placebo for patients with pain in order to assess whether the actually has painful 62% of students sad yes. In both cases, there was no difference between the medical students and the other. In the case of medical students there is a significant difference in the responses provided for the benefit of students of older years.

Conclusions. The knowledge about the treatment of pain, including the use of opioids among young people is insufficient. Medical students of the older years turn out to be better versed on the use of opioids in cancer pain than students of the lower years and other students.

Abstract

Background. Pain occurs in the majority of patients with cancer. Approximately 75% of patients requires administration of opioids. The aim of the study was to evaluate the students’ knowledge about the use of opioids in the treatment of cancer pain.

Material and methods. The study included 167 students in different divisions. The questionnaire prepared for this study was used.

Results. 2/3 of students agreed with the statement that, in the case of chronic pain, opioids used at regular intervals are better than feeding them when pain occurs. 1/4 of respondents thought that before you give another dose of a painkiller, a patient should feel the pain. Students of the medical division more often than students of other divisions gave correct answers to questions about the route of administration and the need to use opioids at regular intervals, without having to wait for pain. More than half of all students believed that increasing doses of painkillers may mean that the patient becomes addicted to opioids. On the question whether it may be useful to provide the placebo for patients with pain in order to assess whether the actually has painful 62% of students sad yes. In both cases, there was no difference between the medical students and the other. In the case of medical students there is a significant difference in the responses provided for the benefit of students of older years.

Conclusions. The knowledge about the treatment of pain, including the use of opioids among young people is insufficient. Medical students of the older years turn out to be better versed on the use of opioids in cancer pain than students of the lower years and other students.

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Keywords

pain in cancer patients, opioids, opiophobia

About this article
Title

What do students know about the use of opioids in the treatment of chronic cancer-related pain

Journal

Palliative Medicine in Practice

Issue

Vol 12, No 2 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

106-117

Published online

2018-06-06

Bibliographic record

Palliat Med Pract 2018;12(2):106-117.

Keywords

pain in cancer patients
opioids
opiophobia

Authors

Monika Rucińska
Anna Kieszkowska-Grudny
Anna Sugajska
Karolina Osowiecka
Anna Siwy-Hudowska

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