open access

Vol 52, No 4 (2018)
Reviews
Submitted: 2018-05-12
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Brain tumor related-epilepsy

Eric D. Goldstein, Anteneh M. Feyissa
DOI: 10.1016/j.pjnns.2018.06.001
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2018;52(4):436-447.

open access

Vol 52, No 4 (2018)
Reviews
Submitted: 2018-05-12

Abstract

Introduction

Gliomas are commonly associated with the development of epilepsy; in some cases the two conditions share common pathogenic mechanisms and may influence each other. Brain tumor related-epilepsy (BTRE) complicates the clinical management of gliomas and can substantially affect daily life.

State of the art

The incidence of seizures is high in patients with slow growing tumors located in the frontotemporal regions. However, recent studies suggest that epileptogenesis may be more associated with tumor molecular genetic markers than tumor grade or location. Although the exact mechanism of epileptogenesis in glioma is incompletely understood, glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and disruption of intracellular communication have garnered the most attention.

Clinical management

Management of BTRE requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), surgery aided by electrocorticography, and adjuvant chemoradiation.

Future directions

Insight into the mechanisms of glioma growth and epileptogenesis is essential to identify new treatment targets and to develop effective treatment for both conditions. Selecting AEDs tailored to act against known tumor molecular markers involved in the epileptogenesis could enhance treatment value and help inform individualized medicine in BRTE.

Abstract

Introduction

Gliomas are commonly associated with the development of epilepsy; in some cases the two conditions share common pathogenic mechanisms and may influence each other. Brain tumor related-epilepsy (BTRE) complicates the clinical management of gliomas and can substantially affect daily life.

State of the art

The incidence of seizures is high in patients with slow growing tumors located in the frontotemporal regions. However, recent studies suggest that epileptogenesis may be more associated with tumor molecular genetic markers than tumor grade or location. Although the exact mechanism of epileptogenesis in glioma is incompletely understood, glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and disruption of intracellular communication have garnered the most attention.

Clinical management

Management of BTRE requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), surgery aided by electrocorticography, and adjuvant chemoradiation.

Future directions

Insight into the mechanisms of glioma growth and epileptogenesis is essential to identify new treatment targets and to develop effective treatment for both conditions. Selecting AEDs tailored to act against known tumor molecular markers involved in the epileptogenesis could enhance treatment value and help inform individualized medicine in BRTE.

Get Citation

Keywords

Antiepileptic drugs, Epileptogensis, Glioma, IDH1 mutation, Tumors markers

About this article
Title

Brain tumor related-epilepsy

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 52, No 4 (2018)

Pages

436-447

DOI

10.1016/j.pjnns.2018.06.001

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2018;52(4):436-447.

Keywords

Antiepileptic drugs
Epileptogensis
Glioma
IDH1 mutation
Tumors markers

Authors

Eric D. Goldstein
Anteneh M. Feyissa

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