open access

Vol 64, No 3 (2013)
Original article
Published online: 2013-09-25
Submitted: 2013-09-25
Accepted: 2013-09-25
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The business case for telemedicine

Chris Henny, Katharine Hartington, Stuart Scott, Agnar Tveiten, Luisa Canals
International Maritime Health 2013;64(3):129-135.

open access

Vol 64, No 3 (2013)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2013-09-25
Submitted: 2013-09-25
Accepted: 2013-09-25

Abstract

Background and aim: Following the coming into force of the International Labour Organisation Maritime Labour Convention (ILO/MLC) and International Maritime Organisation Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping, Manila 2010 (IMO/STCW) amendments, the objective of this article is to provide the shipping community with an initial assessment of the economic reasons and business case, in support of both publicly financed and private telemedicine being implemented on board commercial vessels.

Materials and methods: It provides the global scale of the requirement, the number of Telemedicine Assistance Services (TMAS) calls handled by participating TMAS, the average direct and indirect costs incurred by both TMAS and ship operators, responding to medical emergencies, and also provides a calculation of the market size of about 760 million Euro/year. It estimates a return on investment per ship, of implementing telemedicine on board to meet the MLC and STCW requirements at less than 1 year.

Results and conclusions: 1. There are both financial and soft benefits, such as crew retention and being perceived as a quality employer offering a telemedicine service on board. 2. It is quite possible to obtain a 20% savings to the industry of perhaps 152 million Euro/year from the deployment of telemedicine on board. 3. The deployment of a telemedical service on ships is an opportunity to encourage further cooperation between TMAS and also with the private TMAS sector. 4. There is clearly a great need, on a global basis, for more cooperation, particularly in standardisation of pre-boarding medical files available, the equipmentrequired on board at a minimum, and level of service quality provided. 5. A collection of a common TMAS annual set of normalised statistics from the stakeholders in the maritime industry is needed. Should someone not be tasked with collecting this? 6. Open registries and countries where the private sector only providestele medicine, should be encouraged to work with the global public TMAS system and contribute to its costs?

Abstract

Background and aim: Following the coming into force of the International Labour Organisation Maritime Labour Convention (ILO/MLC) and International Maritime Organisation Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping, Manila 2010 (IMO/STCW) amendments, the objective of this article is to provide the shipping community with an initial assessment of the economic reasons and business case, in support of both publicly financed and private telemedicine being implemented on board commercial vessels.

Materials and methods: It provides the global scale of the requirement, the number of Telemedicine Assistance Services (TMAS) calls handled by participating TMAS, the average direct and indirect costs incurred by both TMAS and ship operators, responding to medical emergencies, and also provides a calculation of the market size of about 760 million Euro/year. It estimates a return on investment per ship, of implementing telemedicine on board to meet the MLC and STCW requirements at less than 1 year.

Results and conclusions: 1. There are both financial and soft benefits, such as crew retention and being perceived as a quality employer offering a telemedicine service on board. 2. It is quite possible to obtain a 20% savings to the industry of perhaps 152 million Euro/year from the deployment of telemedicine on board. 3. The deployment of a telemedical service on ships is an opportunity to encourage further cooperation between TMAS and also with the private TMAS sector. 4. There is clearly a great need, on a global basis, for more cooperation, particularly in standardisation of pre-boarding medical files available, the equipmentrequired on board at a minimum, and level of service quality provided. 5. A collection of a common TMAS annual set of normalised statistics from the stakeholders in the maritime industry is needed. Should someone not be tasked with collecting this? 6. Open registries and countries where the private sector only providestele medicine, should be encouraged to work with the global public TMAS system and contribute to its costs?

Get Citation

Keywords

telemedicine, business case for maritime

About this article
Title

The business case for telemedicine

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 64, No 3 (2013)

Article type

Original article

Pages

129-135

Published online

2013-09-25

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2013;64(3):129-135.

Keywords

telemedicine
business case for maritime

Authors

Chris Henny
Katharine Hartington
Stuart Scott
Agnar Tveiten
Luisa Canals

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