open access

Vol 62, No 4 (2010)
Original article
Submitted: 2013-02-18
Published online: 2011-02-24
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Southern Africa ports as spaces of HIV vulnerability: case studies from South Africa and Namibia

Erin Tansey, NosiphoTheyise, Rosilyne Borland, Haley West
International Maritime Health 2010;62(4):233-240.

open access

Vol 62, No 4 (2010)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original article
Submitted: 2013-02-18
Published online: 2011-02-24

Abstract

There is increasing recognition that in order to respond to the HIV epidemic migrants and mobile populations must be included in national and regional responses. While migration in and of itself does not necessarily contribute to increased risk of HIV infection, some migrants and mobile populations do face increased HIV risk. With its immense coastline and extensive transport industry, Southern Africa provides an excellent case study to examine the HIV risks and vulnerabilities of mobile workers and local communities through port settings. IOM’s research in Southern African ports illustrates why HIV/AIDS policies and programmes must focus on spaces where migrants and mobile populations interact with sedentary populations (including sex workers and other sexual partners) in environments conducive to multiple concurrent partnerships, in order to reduce HIV risk and increase access to treatment, care, and support for all. (Int Marit Health 2010; 61; 4: 233-240)

Abstract

There is increasing recognition that in order to respond to the HIV epidemic migrants and mobile populations must be included in national and regional responses. While migration in and of itself does not necessarily contribute to increased risk of HIV infection, some migrants and mobile populations do face increased HIV risk. With its immense coastline and extensive transport industry, Southern Africa provides an excellent case study to examine the HIV risks and vulnerabilities of mobile workers and local communities through port settings. IOM’s research in Southern African ports illustrates why HIV/AIDS policies and programmes must focus on spaces where migrants and mobile populations interact with sedentary populations (including sex workers and other sexual partners) in environments conducive to multiple concurrent partnerships, in order to reduce HIV risk and increase access to treatment, care, and support for all. (Int Marit Health 2010; 61; 4: 233-240)
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Keywords

migrants; mobile populations; HIV; ports

About this article
Title

Southern Africa ports as spaces of HIV vulnerability: case studies from South Africa and Namibia

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 62, No 4 (2010)

Article type

Original article

Pages

233-240

Published online

2011-02-24

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2010;62(4):233-240.

Keywords

migrants
mobile populations
HIV
ports

Authors

Erin Tansey
NosiphoTheyise
Rosilyne Borland
Haley West

References (8)
  1. International Organization for Migration (IOM). 2006. Ships, Trucks and Clubs: The Dynamics of HIV Risk Behaviour in Walvis Bay Namibia. Paper presented to International Conference Responding to HIV and AIDS in the Fishing Sector in Africa. 2006.
  2. International Organization for Migration (IOM). 2007. Regional Workshop on HIV in the Transpor t Sector International Organization for Migration (IOM). 2009. Regional Workshop on HIV responses among seafarers and port-based communities in southern Africa.
  3. International Organization for Migration (IOM). 2009b. Migration: A Social Determinant of the Health of Migrants, Background Paper of the Assisting Migrants and Communities project.
  4. International Organization for Migration (IOM). 2010a. Country Assessment on HIV-prevention Needs of Migrants and Mobile Populations: South Africa. Pretoria: IOM.
  5. International Organization for Migration (IOM). 2010b. Regional Assessment on HIV-Prevention Needs of Migrants and Mobile Populations in South Africa: Fisheries Sector Report. Pretoria: IOM.
  6. United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)/ /International Organization for Migration (IOM) 2001. Technical Update: Population Mobility and AIDS 2001.
  7. Buse K, Dickinson C, Sidibé M. HIV: know your epidemic, act on its politics. J R Soc Med. 2008; 101(12): 572–573.
  8. Gushulak BD, MacPherson DW. The basic principles of migration health: population mobility and gaps in disease prevalence. Emerg Themes Epidemiol. 2006; 3: 3.

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