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Published online: 2019-08-21
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Victim evacuation techniques in emergency conditions

Paweł Gawlowski, Alicja Biskup
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.a2019.0017

open access

Ahead of Print
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-21

Abstract

The victim at the scene of the incident very often requires evacuation from the danger area to the safe area or from the incident area to the hospital. The choice of technique depends on the number of rescuers available and the condition of the victim, with particular emphasis on serious and life-threatening injuries. Evacuation can take place without the use of equipment, when the rescuer or rescuers carry the victim on their own hands. The optimal solution, especially for trauma patients, is to evacuate them using equipment that allows stabilization of the whole body and safe handling of the injured in vertical and horizontal planes.

Abstract

The victim at the scene of the incident very often requires evacuation from the danger area to the safe area or from the incident area to the hospital. The choice of technique depends on the number of rescuers available and the condition of the victim, with particular emphasis on serious and life-threatening injuries. Evacuation can take place without the use of equipment, when the rescuer or rescuers carry the victim on their own hands. The optimal solution, especially for trauma patients, is to evacuate them using equipment that allows stabilization of the whole body and safe handling of the injured in vertical and horizontal planes.

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Keywords

evacuation; victim; medical rescue; rescue equipment; paramedic.

About this article
Title

Victim evacuation techniques in emergency conditions

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-08-21

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.a2019.0017

Keywords

evacuation
victim
medical rescue
rescue equipment
paramedic.

Authors

Paweł Gawlowski
Alicja Biskup

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