open access

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-31
Get Citation

Application of interventional ultrasound in emergency medicine conditions

Maciej Dudek, Lukasz Szarpak, Kurt Ruetzler
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0029
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(4):137-147.

open access

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-31

Abstract

ULTRASONOGRAPHY is a modern diagnostic tool both in intensive care and emergency medicine. Small, portable and simple ultrasound devices have been introduced due to technological advances. The image quality, size, and weight of portable ultrasound devices are improving. Prehospital point-of-care ultrasonog- raphy may have an impact on the decision making in prioritizing initial treatment. First aid at the scene of the accident and transporting the patient to the hospital is a key element, which in the case of appropriate diagnostics allows you to fight life-threatening injuries. The intention of using ultrasound protocols is to shorten and simplify the ultrasound examination allowing to eliminate or find complications of an injury as soon as possible. The protocols used include elements of ultrasonography and echocardiography of the lung tissue, abdominal cavity, pelvis, large vessels or the eyeball. The intention of the authors of the article was to present to the reader the basic ultrasound protocols applicable to patients in emergency situations. 

Abstract

ULTRASONOGRAPHY is a modern diagnostic tool both in intensive care and emergency medicine. Small, portable and simple ultrasound devices have been introduced due to technological advances. The image quality, size, and weight of portable ultrasound devices are improving. Prehospital point-of-care ultrasonog- raphy may have an impact on the decision making in prioritizing initial treatment. First aid at the scene of the accident and transporting the patient to the hospital is a key element, which in the case of appropriate diagnostics allows you to fight life-threatening injuries. The intention of using ultrasound protocols is to shorten and simplify the ultrasound examination allowing to eliminate or find complications of an injury as soon as possible. The protocols used include elements of ultrasonography and echocardiography of the lung tissue, abdominal cavity, pelvis, large vessels or the eyeball. The intention of the authors of the article was to present to the reader the basic ultrasound protocols applicable to patients in emergency situations. 

Get Citation

Keywords

point-of-care ultrasonography; emergency medicine; ultrasonography; diagnostic imaging; review

About this article
Title

Application of interventional ultrasound in emergency medicine conditions

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)

Pages

137-147

Published online

2018-12-31

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0029

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(4):137-147.

Keywords

point-of-care ultrasonography
emergency medicine
ultrasonography
diagnostic imaging
review

Authors

Maciej Dudek
Lukasz Szarpak
Kurt Ruetzler

References (46)
  1. Whitson MR, Mayo PH. Ultrasonography in the emergency department. Crit Care. 2016; 20(1): 227.
  2. Marin J, Lewiss R. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography by Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physicians. Pediatric Emergency Care. 2015; 31(7): 525.
  3. Marin JR, Lewiss RE. American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, Academy of Emergency Ultrasound, American College of Emergency Physicians, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Committee, World Interactive Network Focused on Critical Ultrasound. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians. Pediatrics. 2015; 135(4): e1113–e1122.
  4. Barbariol F, Vetrugno L, Pompei L, et al. Point-of-care ultrasound of the diaphragm in a liver transplant patient with acute respiratory failure. Crit Ultrasound J. 2015; 7: 3.
  5. Lui JK, Banauch GI. Diagnostic Bedside Ultrasonography for Acute Respiratory Failure and Severe Hypoxemia in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: Basics and Comprehensive Approaches. J Intensive Care Med. 2017; 32(6): 355–372.
  6. Richards JR, McGahan JP. Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) in 2017: What Radiologists Can Learn. Radiology. 2017; 283(1): 30–48.
  7. Todsen T, Tolsgaard MG. Assessment of competence in focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2016; 80(2): 353.
  8. Fornell Pérez R. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) versus multidetector computed tomography in hemodynamically unstable emergency patients. Radiologia. 2017; 59(6): 531–534.
  9. Calder BW, Vogel AM, Zhang J, et al. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma in children after blunt abdominal trauma: A multi-institutional analysis. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2017; 83(2): 218–224.
  10. Chung GK, Gyllenhammer RG, Baker EL, et al. Effects of simulation-based practice on focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) window identification, acquisition, and diagnosis. Mil Med. 2013; 178(10 Suppl): 87–97.
  11. Rozycki GS, Ochsner MG, Feliciano DV, et al. Early detection of hemoperitoneum by ultrasound examination of the right upper quadrant: a multicenter study. J Trauma. 1998; 45(5): 878–883.
  12. O'Brien KM, Stolz LA, Amini R, et al. Focused Assessment With Sonography for Trauma Examination: Reexamining the Importance of the Left Upper Quadrant View. J Ultrasound Med. 2015; 34(8): 1429–1434.
  13. Shaukat NM, Copeli N, Desai P. The Focused Assessment With Sonography For Trauma (FAST) Examination And Pelvic Trauma: Indications And Limitations. Emerg Med Pract. 2016; 18(3): 1–20, 24; quiz 20.
  14. Frink M, Lechler P, Debus F, et al. Multiple Trauma and Emergency Room Management. Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2017; 114(29-30): 497–503.
  15. Pencil K. eFAST Simulation Training for Trauma Providers. J Trauma Nurs. 2017; 24(6): 376–380.
  16. Montoya J, Stawicki SP, Evans DC, et al. From FAST to E-FAST: an overview of the evolution of ultrasound-based traumatic injury assessment. Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg. 2016; 42(2): 119–126.
  17. Lichtenstein DA. BLUE-protocol and FALLS-protocol: two applications of lung ultrasound in the critically ill. Chest. 2015; 147(6): 1659–1670.
  18. Lichtenstein DA, Mezière GA. Relevance of lung ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute respiratory failure: the BLUE protocol. Chest. 2008; 134(1): 117–125.
  19. Seyedhosseini J, Bashizadeh-Fakhar G, Farzaneh S, et al. The impact of the BLUE protocol ultrasonography on the time taken to treat acute respiratory distress in the ED. Am J Emerg Med. 2017; 35(12): 1815–1818.
  20. Khosla R. Bedside lung ultrasound in emergency (BLUE) protocol: a suggestion to modify. Chest. 2010; 137(6): 1487.
  21. Lichtenstein D. Lung ultrasound in the critically ill. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2014; 20(3): 315–322.
  22. Nishigami K. Point-of-care echocardiography for aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain: EASY screening focused on the assessment of effusion, aorta, ventricular size and shape and ventricular asynergy. J Echocardiogr. 2015; 13(4): 141–144.
  23. Nazerian P, Vanni S, Castelli M, et al. Diagnostic performance of emergency transthoracic focus cardiac ultrasound in suspected acute type A aortic dissection. Intern Emerg Med. 2014; 9(6): 665–670.
  24. Rossinen J. FATE echocardiography at the emergency outpatient unit. Duodecim. 2016; 132(8): 783–790.
  25. Jensen MB, Sloth E. [Transthoracic ultrasound: a necessary standard within intensive, acute and pre-hospital medicine]. Ugeskr Laeger. 2006; 168(50): 4393–4396.
  26. Blanco P, Aguiar FM, Blaivas M. Rapid Ultrasound in Shock (RUSH) Velocity-Time Integral: A Proposal to Expand the RUSH Protocol. J Ultrasound Med. 2015; 34(9): 1691–1700.
  27. Estoos E, Nakitende D. Diagnostic Ultrasound Use In Undifferentiated Hypotension. StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing. 2018 Jan-.2018 Oct 27.
  28. Ladny M, Szarpak L, Smereka J, et al. A comparison of comfort assessment of NECKLITE vs. NeXsplint cervical collar. Pilot data. Am J Emerg Med. 2018; 36(11): 2127–2128.
  29. Steinborn M, Friedmann M, Hahn H, et al. Normal values for transbulbar sonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) in children and adolescents. Ultraschall Med. 2015; 36(1): 54–58.
  30. Rajajee V, Vanaman M, Fletcher JJ, et al. Optic nerve ultrasound for the detection of raised intracranial pressure. Neurocrit Care. 2011; 15(3): 506–515.
  31. Hylkema C. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Ultrasound and the Diagnosis of Increased Intracranial Pressure. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 2016; 28(1): 95–99.
  32. Raffiz M, Abdullah JM. Optic nerve sheath diameter measurement: a means of detecting raised ICP in adult traumatic and non-traumatic neurosurgical patients. Am J Emerg Med. 2017; 35(1): 150–153.
  33. Kavi T, Gupta A, Hunter K, et al. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Assessment in Patients with Intracranial Pressure Monitoring. Cureus. 2018; 10(11): e3546.
  34. Vaish H, Kumar V, Anand R, et al. The Correlation Between Inferior Vena Cava Diameter Measured by Ultrasonography and Central Venous Pressure. Indian J Pediatr. 2017; 84(10): 757–762.
  35. Varol A, Basa S, Topsakal A, et al. Assessment of synovial vascularization by power Doppler ultrasonography in TMJ internal derangements treated arthroscopically. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2008; 46(8): 625–630.
  36. Koster G, van der Horst ICC. Critical care ultrasonography in circulatory shock. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2017; 23(4): 326–333.
  37. Bhanji F, Donoghue AJ, Wolff MS, et al. Part 14: Education: 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Circulation. 2015; 132(18 Suppl 2): S561–S573.
  38. Breitkreutz R, Walcher F, Seeger FH. Focused echocardiographic evaluation in resuscitation management: concept of an advanced life support-conformed algorithm. Crit Care Med. 2007; 35(5 Suppl): S150–S161.
  39. Price S, Uddin S, Quinn T. Echocardiography in cardiac arrest. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2010; 16(3): 211–215.
  40. Breitkreutz R, Price S, Steiger HV, et al. Emergency Ultrasound Working Group of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Frankfurt am Main. Focused echocardiographic evaluation in life support and peri-resuscitation of emergency patients: a prospective trial. Resuscitation. 2010; 81(11): 1527–1533.
  41. Price S, Ilper H, Uddin S, et al. Peri-resuscitation echocardiography: training the novice practitioner. Resuscitation. 2010; 81(11): 1534–1539.
  42. Maufus M, Elias A, Barrellier MT, et al. French Society for Vascular Medicine. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis recurrence: Ultrasound criteria. Thromb Res. 2018; 161: 78–83.
  43. Pomero F, Dentali F, Borretta V, et al. Accuracy of emergency physician-performed ultrasonography in the diagnosis of deep-vein thrombosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Thromb Haemost. 2013; 109(1): 137–145.
  44. Valentin ML, Clemens R, Thalhammer C. Duplex ultrasound of deep vein thrombosis of the leg. Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2016; 141(13): 946–949.
  45. Matthew Fields J, Davis J, Alsup C, et al. Accuracy of Point-of-care Ultrasonography for Diagnosing Acute Appendicitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Acad Emerg Med. 2017; 24(9): 1124–1136.
  46. Liu RB, Donroe JH, McNamara RL, et al. The Practice and Implications of Finding Fluid During Point-of-Care Ultrasonography: A Review. JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(12): 1818–1825.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, fax:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl