open access

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-31
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The knowledge of and attitudes toward anaphylaxis emergency management among Polish dentists

Piotr Ptaszynski, Andrzej Raczynski, Marcin Aluchna, Alicja Aluchna, Jacek Smereka
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0027
·
Pubmed: 21227117
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(4):125-130.

open access

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-31

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening medical emergency condition requiring immediate diag- nosis and implementation of proper treatment. For the medical personnel facing a patient suspected of anaphylaxis, the necessary rapid initial management includes removing the allergen, calling for help, clear- ing the airway, laying the patient, and administering adrenaline in an intramuscular injection and oxygen. Airway management, intravenous access, and intravenous fluid challenge, as well as chlorphenamine and hydrocortisone injection, are also suggested if the medical personnel has appropriate skills and equipment available. Many studies emphasize that dentists feel inadequately trained to recognize and treat medical emergencies in dental offices, which especially refers to anaphylaxis. The aim of the study was to assess the dentists’ preparedness, knowledge, and attitudes with regard to anaphylaxis in dental offices in Poland. 

METHODS: The study was conducted between November 2016 and November 2017 during scientific meet- ings and congresses in Poland. The participants (Polish dentists) received information on the study objectives and voluntarily took part in the questionnaire survey. The questionnaire included 20 items concerning age, gender, work experience, specialization, latest training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, onset time of aller- gic reaction, stridor, first line pharmacological treatment, route of administration and doses of adrenaline in different age groups, other medications recommended in anaphylaxis. 

RESULTS: Overall, 500 active dentists working in Poland were offered to participate in the questionnaire study; 268 questionnaires were returned (53.6%), including 18 partially filled. Finally, 250 questionnaires were further analyzed. The mean age of the participants was 42.33 ± 10.53 years, 226 (90.4%) were fe- male, and the mean work experience equaled 14.35 ± 9.27 years. The total of 28.8% of subjects attended cardiopulmonary resuscitation training within 12 months prior to the study, 38.40% within the previous 2–5 years, 17.20% within the previous 6–10 years, 8.00% 10 or more years earlier, and 7.60% had never participated in such training since graduation. 24.4% of the participants stated that ingestion of food to which a patient was allergic resulted in severe anaphylactic reaction typically within 30 minutes, and 21.60% stated that in the case of contact with bee or wasp venom, severe anaphylaxis typically occurred within 10–15 minutes. Out of the study participants, 66.40% maintained that adrenaline was the first line drug in anaphylaxis; 27.2% indicated intramuscular route as the standard route for adrenaline injection in anaphylaxis; 46.4% pointed at the correct dose of adrenaline in anaphylaxis. The proper adrenaline dose in anaphylaxis for a 4-year-old child was indicated by 42.00% and for a 10-year-old child by 36.4%. The correct dose of hydrocortisone in a 10-year-old child was provided by 18.40%. 

CONCLUSIONS: Among Polish dentists, the knowledge concerning the diagnosis and emergency treatment in anaphylaxis is low. Better postgraduate training including anaphylaxis management in dental offices should be recommended. 

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening medical emergency condition requiring immediate diag- nosis and implementation of proper treatment. For the medical personnel facing a patient suspected of anaphylaxis, the necessary rapid initial management includes removing the allergen, calling for help, clear- ing the airway, laying the patient, and administering adrenaline in an intramuscular injection and oxygen. Airway management, intravenous access, and intravenous fluid challenge, as well as chlorphenamine and hydrocortisone injection, are also suggested if the medical personnel has appropriate skills and equipment available. Many studies emphasize that dentists feel inadequately trained to recognize and treat medical emergencies in dental offices, which especially refers to anaphylaxis. The aim of the study was to assess the dentists’ preparedness, knowledge, and attitudes with regard to anaphylaxis in dental offices in Poland. 

METHODS: The study was conducted between November 2016 and November 2017 during scientific meet- ings and congresses in Poland. The participants (Polish dentists) received information on the study objectives and voluntarily took part in the questionnaire survey. The questionnaire included 20 items concerning age, gender, work experience, specialization, latest training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, onset time of aller- gic reaction, stridor, first line pharmacological treatment, route of administration and doses of adrenaline in different age groups, other medications recommended in anaphylaxis. 

RESULTS: Overall, 500 active dentists working in Poland were offered to participate in the questionnaire study; 268 questionnaires were returned (53.6%), including 18 partially filled. Finally, 250 questionnaires were further analyzed. The mean age of the participants was 42.33 ± 10.53 years, 226 (90.4%) were fe- male, and the mean work experience equaled 14.35 ± 9.27 years. The total of 28.8% of subjects attended cardiopulmonary resuscitation training within 12 months prior to the study, 38.40% within the previous 2–5 years, 17.20% within the previous 6–10 years, 8.00% 10 or more years earlier, and 7.60% had never participated in such training since graduation. 24.4% of the participants stated that ingestion of food to which a patient was allergic resulted in severe anaphylactic reaction typically within 30 minutes, and 21.60% stated that in the case of contact with bee or wasp venom, severe anaphylaxis typically occurred within 10–15 minutes. Out of the study participants, 66.40% maintained that adrenaline was the first line drug in anaphylaxis; 27.2% indicated intramuscular route as the standard route for adrenaline injection in anaphylaxis; 46.4% pointed at the correct dose of adrenaline in anaphylaxis. The proper adrenaline dose in anaphylaxis for a 4-year-old child was indicated by 42.00% and for a 10-year-old child by 36.4%. The correct dose of hydrocortisone in a 10-year-old child was provided by 18.40%. 

CONCLUSIONS: Among Polish dentists, the knowledge concerning the diagnosis and emergency treatment in anaphylaxis is low. Better postgraduate training including anaphylaxis management in dental offices should be recommended. 

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Keywords

dentist; anaphylaxis; medical emergency; dental education

About this article
Title

The knowledge of and attitudes toward anaphylaxis emergency management among Polish dentists

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)

Pages

125-130

Published online

2018-12-31

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0027

Pubmed

21227117

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(4):125-130.

Keywords

dentist
anaphylaxis
medical emergency
dental education

Authors

Piotr Ptaszynski
Andrzej Raczynski
Marcin Aluchna
Alicja Aluchna
Jacek Smereka

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