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Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2018-06-12
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IMMIGRATION AND CHILDREN

Burak Katipoğlu, Perihan Şimşek, Abdülkadir Gündüz
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0006
·
Pubmed: 27158629
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(1):26-30.

open access

Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2018-06-12

Abstract

Various economic, political, environmental and social reasons can force people to migrate, leaving their home. Migration, which is as old as human history, has increased because of some reasons such as globaliza­tion, wars and natural disasters. Children have constituted a significant proportion of immigrants. According to the report of the United Nations Children’s Fund for 2015, the number of immigrant children living in a different country from the country of their birth is approximately 31 million, of whom about 10 million are refugees around the world.

Children have been obliged to deal with many problems such as hunger, thirst and illness during their migratory journey. In countries to which children migrated to seek asylum, children have been exposed to a great deal of abuse and exploitation, including violence, human trafficking and participation in criminal organisations. Unaccompanied children are especially vulnerable to all these hazards.

The physical and mental health of immigrant children is affected by cultural, geographical and climatic changes. Not knowing the language of the destination country and being unable to communicate with their peers causes an impact of psychological trauma on children. In addition, refugee children living in difficult conditions for a long time are at risk of mental problems and behavioural disorders.

Abstract

Various economic, political, environmental and social reasons can force people to migrate, leaving their home. Migration, which is as old as human history, has increased because of some reasons such as globaliza­tion, wars and natural disasters. Children have constituted a significant proportion of immigrants. According to the report of the United Nations Children’s Fund for 2015, the number of immigrant children living in a different country from the country of their birth is approximately 31 million, of whom about 10 million are refugees around the world.

Children have been obliged to deal with many problems such as hunger, thirst and illness during their migratory journey. In countries to which children migrated to seek asylum, children have been exposed to a great deal of abuse and exploitation, including violence, human trafficking and participation in criminal organisations. Unaccompanied children are especially vulnerable to all these hazards.

The physical and mental health of immigrant children is affected by cultural, geographical and climatic changes. Not knowing the language of the destination country and being unable to communicate with their peers causes an impact of psychological trauma on children. In addition, refugee children living in difficult conditions for a long time are at risk of mental problems and behavioural disorders.

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Keywords

asylum, child, immigrant child, immigration, refugee

About this article
Title

IMMIGRATION AND CHILDREN

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 3, No 1 (2018)

Pages

26-30

Published online

2018-06-12

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0006

Pubmed

27158629

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(1):26-30.

Keywords

asylum
child
immigrant child
immigration
refugee

Authors

Burak Katipoğlu
Perihan Şimşek
Abdülkadir Gündüz

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