open access

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-10-20
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Learning through simulation

Anna Abelsson
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0027
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(3):125-128.

open access

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-10-20

Abstract

With simulation, caregivers are given the opportunity to improve their knowledge and skills. With simulation, both theoretical and practical knowledge is taught. With the experiences that simulation creates, critical thinking and better care are developed. Learning through simulation complements the learning that takes place in everyday work and can have a positive effect of the advances of the care profession. The purpose of simulation may vary and different learning theories are used, both based on learning objectives and the purpose of the simulation. The experience gained from simulation prepares caregivers on how similar complex situations can be handled in the future.

Abstract

With simulation, caregivers are given the opportunity to improve their knowledge and skills. With simulation, both theoretical and practical knowledge is taught. With the experiences that simulation creates, critical thinking and better care are developed. Learning through simulation complements the learning that takes place in everyday work and can have a positive effect of the advances of the care profession. The purpose of simulation may vary and different learning theories are used, both based on learning objectives and the purpose of the simulation. The experience gained from simulation prepares caregivers on how similar complex situations can be handled in the future.

Get Citation

Keywords

simulation, experiential learning theory, theoretical knowledge, practical skills

About this article
Title

Learning through simulation

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)

Pages

125-128

Published online

2017-10-20

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0027

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(3):125-128.

Keywords

simulation
experiential learning theory
theoretical knowledge
practical skills

Authors

Anna Abelsson

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