open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2022)
Original paper
Published online: 2022-03-30
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Leptin in obesity and hypertension

Hilal Bhat1, Javaid Ahmad Bhat2, Moomin Hussain Bhat1, Masrat Rashid3, Rafi Jan4, Dil Afroze
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2022.0003
·
Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(1):26-31.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Endocrinology, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Scences, Srinagar, Kashmir, India
  2. Superspeciality Hospital, Government Medical College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India
  3. Vallabhbai Patel Chest Institute, University Of Delhi, North Campus, Delhi, India
  4. Department of Medicine, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Kashmir, India

open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2022)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2022-03-30

Abstract

Background: Obesity along with hypertension is the common risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Leptin, an anti-obesity hormone, is currently considered to play a vital role in the development of hypertension in obesity. We aim to determine the leptin levels in hypertensive and normotensive participants and to find the correlation between leptin and hypertension in obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects.

Material and methods: A total of 94 participants aged > 18years of either gender were included in the study. The participants were divided into obese (n = 55) and non-obese (n = 39) groups with further subgroups based on presence or absence of hypertension. Height, weight and blood pressure were taken with standard methods. Leptin was determined using ELISA method and intra and inter-group comparisons were made.

Results: The leptin levels were significantly higher in obese (p = 0.000), hypertensive (p = 0.048) and females (p = 0.001) compared to non-obese, normotensive and male participants. Furthermore, obese hypertensive participants were having higher leptin levels compared to obese normotensive participants but with no statistical significance (p = 0.14). Serum leptin levels positively correlated with serum LDL (p = 0.003), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.000), serum uric acid (p = 0.034) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (p = 0.001). However, on correction for factors like BMI, and obesity, positive correlation persisted only for female gender (p = 0.048) and FPG (p = 0.029). Furthermore, BMI (p = 0.021) and FPG (p = 0.027) were found to be the independent risk factors for elevated leptin levels on multiple regression analysis.

Conclusions: Our study concluded that serum leptin levels are higher in obesity and have a direct correlation with degree of obesity. However, our study does not support any direct correlation between serum leptin and hypertension.

Abstract

Background: Obesity along with hypertension is the common risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Leptin, an anti-obesity hormone, is currently considered to play a vital role in the development of hypertension in obesity. We aim to determine the leptin levels in hypertensive and normotensive participants and to find the correlation between leptin and hypertension in obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects.

Material and methods: A total of 94 participants aged > 18years of either gender were included in the study. The participants were divided into obese (n = 55) and non-obese (n = 39) groups with further subgroups based on presence or absence of hypertension. Height, weight and blood pressure were taken with standard methods. Leptin was determined using ELISA method and intra and inter-group comparisons were made.

Results: The leptin levels were significantly higher in obese (p = 0.000), hypertensive (p = 0.048) and females (p = 0.001) compared to non-obese, normotensive and male participants. Furthermore, obese hypertensive participants were having higher leptin levels compared to obese normotensive participants but with no statistical significance (p = 0.14). Serum leptin levels positively correlated with serum LDL (p = 0.003), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.000), serum uric acid (p = 0.034) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (p = 0.001). However, on correction for factors like BMI, and obesity, positive correlation persisted only for female gender (p = 0.048) and FPG (p = 0.029). Furthermore, BMI (p = 0.021) and FPG (p = 0.027) were found to be the independent risk factors for elevated leptin levels on multiple regression analysis.

Conclusions: Our study concluded that serum leptin levels are higher in obesity and have a direct correlation with degree of obesity. However, our study does not support any direct correlation between serum leptin and hypertension.

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Keywords

leptin; obesity; hypertension

About this article
Title

Leptin in obesity and hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 26, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

26-31

Published online

2022-03-30

Page views

243

Article views/downloads

46

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2022.0003

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(1):26-31.

Keywords

leptin
obesity
hypertension

Authors

Hilal Bhat
Javaid Ahmad Bhat
Moomin Hussain Bhat
Masrat Rashid
Rafi Jan
Dil Afroze

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