open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2022)
Original paper
Published online: 2021-09-30
Get Citation

Effectiveness of a self-management education program on hypertension control and contributing factors in older adults: an interventional trial

Elaheh Foroumandi1, Mohammad Alizadeh2, Omid Nikpayam3, Sorayya Kheirouri3
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2021.0025
·
Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(1):32-38.
Affiliations
  1. Iranian Research Center on Healthy Aging, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran
  2. Nutrition Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  3. Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2022)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2021-09-30

Abstract

Background: One of the common disorders that may negatively affect the health status in elderly is hypertension. Self-management education offers an effective method to control various disorders. This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of self-management educational program on blood pressure, and other cardiometabolic risk factors control among elderly patients from Tabriz, Iran.

Material and methods: 227 eligible hypertensive elderly patients from three primary health care centers of Tabriz participated in 12 sessions of self-management education intervention conducted in 6 months from April to October 2019. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum levels of fasting blood sugar (FBS), total cholesterol (TC), and triglyceride, as well as anthropometric indices were assessed both before and at the end of the intervention.

Results: The participants were 64.5 ± 5.8 years of age (mean ± SD). After 6-month attendance in educational sessions, the SBP (p = 0.04), body weight (p = 0.01), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.02), FBS (p = 0.01), and TC (p < 0.0001) were lower as referred to baseline.

Conclusion: Study suggests self-management education programs in elderly may be beneficial for cardiovascular risk factors control.

Abstract

Background: One of the common disorders that may negatively affect the health status in elderly is hypertension. Self-management education offers an effective method to control various disorders. This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of self-management educational program on blood pressure, and other cardiometabolic risk factors control among elderly patients from Tabriz, Iran.

Material and methods: 227 eligible hypertensive elderly patients from three primary health care centers of Tabriz participated in 12 sessions of self-management education intervention conducted in 6 months from April to October 2019. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum levels of fasting blood sugar (FBS), total cholesterol (TC), and triglyceride, as well as anthropometric indices were assessed both before and at the end of the intervention.

Results: The participants were 64.5 ± 5.8 years of age (mean ± SD). After 6-month attendance in educational sessions, the SBP (p = 0.04), body weight (p = 0.01), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.02), FBS (p = 0.01), and TC (p < 0.0001) were lower as referred to baseline.

Conclusion: Study suggests self-management education programs in elderly may be beneficial for cardiovascular risk factors control.

Get Citation

Keywords

self-management; education; hypertension; metabolic syndrome; elderly; Iran

About this article
Title

Effectiveness of a self-management education program on hypertension control and contributing factors in older adults: an interventional trial

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 26, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

32-38

Published online

2021-09-30

Page views

623

Article views/downloads

59

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2021.0025

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(1):32-38.

Keywords

self-management
education
hypertension
metabolic syndrome
elderly
Iran

Authors

Elaheh Foroumandi
Mohammad Alizadeh
Omid Nikpayam
Sorayya Kheirouri

References (36)
  1. World Health Organisation. Global Database of Age-friendly Practices. https://www.who.int/healthinfo/survey/ageingdefnolder/en/.
  2. Song P, Chen Yu. Public policy response, aging in place, and big data platforms: Creating an effective collaborative system to cope with aging of the population. Biosci Trends. 2015; 9(1): 1–6.
  3. DESA U. 2017 Revision of World Population Prospects. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division 2015.
  4. World Health Organization. Integrated care for older people: realigning primary health care to respond to population ageing. WHO, Geneva 2018.
  5. Nwankwo T, Yoon SS, Burt V, et al. Hypertension among adults in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012. NCHS Data Brief. 2013; 133: 1–8.
  6. Whelton PK, He J, Muntner P. Prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension in North America, North Africa and Asia. J Hum Hypertens. 2004; 18(8): 545–551.
  7. Papademetriou V, Piller LB, Ford CE, et al. ALLHAT Collaborative Research Group. Characteristics and lipid distribution of a large, high-risk, hypertensive population: the lipid-lowering component of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2003; 5(6): 377–384.
  8. Alderman MH, Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, et al. Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National High Blood Pressure Education Program Coordinating Committee, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure, National High Blood Pressure Education Program Coordinating Committee. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure: the JNC 7 report. JAMA. 2003; 289(19): 2560–2572.
  9. Whelton PK, He J, Appel LJ, et al. National High Blood Pressure Education Program Coordinating Committee. Primary prevention of hypertension: clinical and public health advisory from The National High Blood Pressure Education Program. JAMA. 2002; 288(15): 1882–1888.
  10. Giugliano D, Esposito K. The Metabolic Syndrome: Time for a Critical Appraisal: Joint Statement From the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes: Response to Kahn et al. Diabetes Care. 2005; 29(1): 175–176.
  11. Foroumandi E, Kheirouri S, Alizadeh M. The potency of education programs for management of blood pressure through increasing self-efficacy of hypertensive patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Patient Educ Couns. 2020; 103(3): 451–461.
  12. Clark N, Becker M, Janz N, et al. Self-Management of Chronic Disease by Older Adults. J Aging Health. 2016; 3(1): 3–27.
  13. Lynch EB, Liebman R, Ventrelle J, et al. A self-management intervention for African Americans with comorbid diabetes and hypertension: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Prev Chronic Dis. 2014; 11: E90.
  14. Chapter 8. Hypertension in the elderly. Hyperten Res. 2009; 32(1): 57–62.
  15. Sacks FM, Appel LJ, Moore TJ, et al. A dietary approach to prevent hypertension: a review of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Study. Clin Cardiol. 1999; 22(7 Suppl): III6–II10.
  16. The effects of nonpharmacologic interventions on blood pressure of persons with high normal levels. Results of the Trials of Hypertension Prevention, Phase I. JAMA. 1992; 267(9): 1213–1220.
  17. Neter JE, Stam BE, Kok FJ, et al. Influence of weight reduction on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Hypertension. 2003; 42(5): 878–884.
  18. Whelton SP, Chin A, Xin X, et al. Effect of aerobic exercise on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Ann Intern Med. 2002; 136(7): 493–503.
  19. Kelley GA, Kelley KS. Progressive resistance exercise and resting blood pressure : A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Hypertension. 2000; 35(3): 838–843.
  20. Hacihasanoğlu R, Gözüm S. The effect of patient education and home monitoring on medication compliance, hypertension management, healthy lifestyle behaviours and BMI in a primary health care setting. J Clin Nurs. 2011; 20(5-6): 692–705.
  21. Neter JE, Stam BE, Kok FJ, et al. Influence of weight reduction on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Hypertension. 2003; 42(5): 878–884.
  22. Tate DF, Jackvony EH, Wing RR. Effects of Internet behavioral counseling on weight loss in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial. JAMA. 2003; 289(14): 1833–1836.
  23. Johnson W, Kyvik KO, Skytthe A, et al. Education modifies genetic and environmental influences on BMI. PLoS One. 2011; 6(1): e16290.
  24. Seravalle G, Grassi G. Obesity and hypertension. Pharmacol Res. 2017; 122: 1–7.
  25. Cicolini G, Simonetti V, Comparcini D, et al. Efficacy of a nurse-led email reminder program for cardiovascular prevention risk reduction in hypertensive patients: a randomized controlled trial. Int J Nurs Stud. 2014; 51(6): 833–843.
  26. Milajerdi A, Shab-Bidar S, Azizgol A, et al. Provision of nutritional/lifestyle counseling on diabetes self-management: A chance to improve metabolic control in new cases of type 2 diabetes. J Nutr Sci Diet. 2015; 1(2): 98–106.
  27. Bosworth HB, Olsen MK, Gentry P, et al. Nurse administered telephone intervention for blood pressure control: a patient-tailored multifactorial intervention. Patient Educ Couns. 2005; 57(1): 5–14.
  28. Rudd P, Miller NH, Kaufman J, et al. Nurse management for hypertension. A systems approach. Am J Hypertens. 2004; 17(10): 921–927.
  29. Canzanello VJ, Jensen PL, Schwartz LL, Worra JB, Klein LL. ed. Improved blood pressure control with a physician-nurse team and home blood pressure measurement. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Elsevier, Rochester 2005.
  30. Dye CJ, Williams JE, Evatt JH. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches. Health Promot Pract. 2015; 16(2): 271–281.
  31. McManus RJ, Mant J, Bray EP, et al. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of telemonitoring and self-management in the control of hypertension: telemonitoring and self-management in hypertension. [ISRCTN17585681]. BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2009; 9(9736): 6–172.
  32. Park YH, Song M, Cho BL, et al. The effects of an integrated health education and exercise program in community-dwelling older adults with hypertension: a randomized controlled trial. Patient Educ Couns. 2011; 82(1): 133–137.
  33. Watson AJ, Singh K, Myint-U K, et al. Evaluating a web-based self-management program for employees with hypertension and prehypertension: a randomized clinical trial. Am Heart J. 2012; 164(4): 625–631.
  34. Lee JK. [Evaluation of a medication self-management education program for elders with hypertension living in the community]. J Korean Acad Nurs. 2013; 43(2): 267–275.
  35. Kim H, Park S, Ju K, et al. The Effect of the 3-step Health Education and Tele-coaching Program for the Disabled People with Hypertension in Rural Regions. Int J Bio-Sci Bio-Tech. 2014; 6(5): 123–130.
  36. Glynn LG, Murphy AW, Smith SM, et al. Self-monitoring and other non-pharmacological interventions to improve the management of hypertension in primary care: a systematic review. Br J Gen Pract. 2010; 60(581): e476–e488.

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl