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Vol 23, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-02-22
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Analysis of blood pressure control in outpatients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease referred by primary care physicians: a study from the centre of nephrology care

Olexandr Kuryata, Tetiana Yaschenko, Viktor Semenov
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2019.0004
·
Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(2):88-97.

open access

Vol 23, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-02-22

Abstract

Background. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased all-cause mortality, especially cardiovascular.
The majority of patients with CKD have stages 1–3 and are treated by primary care physicians and nephrologists.
Arterial hypertension (HTN) is highly prevalent comorbidity among CKD population, but its control remains poor.

Material and methods. This retrospective non-interventional cross-sectional study was conducted in the Centre of
Nephrology Care in Dnipropetrovsk Mechnikov Regional Hospital, Dnipro, Ukraine. We aimed to select patients
who are supposed to be followed-up by primary care practitioners but due to certain reasons required nephrologist’s
consultation. From 4540 patients who received medical care in the Centre of Nephrology Care 365 patients fulfilled
inclusion criteria. They were subdivided by presence of HTN, CKD stage, presence of proteinuria and achieving
blood pressure targets according to different standards. All patients were examined and followed-up according to
local and European standards.

Results. Forty-nine percent of patients had known HTN, and 21% had HTN de novo. Advance of CKD stage was
significantly associated with increase in the most of laboratory findings, age and BP values. Non-proteinuric patients
achieved BP goals significantly more often, than proteinuric ones. Females achieved BP targets more often, than
males. Monotherapy was the most common treatment regimen.

Conclusions. HTN occurs in 70% of patients with CKD and it is controlled in up to 34% of cases. HTN is important
factor of CKD progression and it is closely connected with GFR and proteinuria.

Abstract

Background. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased all-cause mortality, especially cardiovascular.
The majority of patients with CKD have stages 1–3 and are treated by primary care physicians and nephrologists.
Arterial hypertension (HTN) is highly prevalent comorbidity among CKD population, but its control remains poor.

Material and methods. This retrospective non-interventional cross-sectional study was conducted in the Centre of
Nephrology Care in Dnipropetrovsk Mechnikov Regional Hospital, Dnipro, Ukraine. We aimed to select patients
who are supposed to be followed-up by primary care practitioners but due to certain reasons required nephrologist’s
consultation. From 4540 patients who received medical care in the Centre of Nephrology Care 365 patients fulfilled
inclusion criteria. They were subdivided by presence of HTN, CKD stage, presence of proteinuria and achieving
blood pressure targets according to different standards. All patients were examined and followed-up according to
local and European standards.

Results. Forty-nine percent of patients had known HTN, and 21% had HTN de novo. Advance of CKD stage was
significantly associated with increase in the most of laboratory findings, age and BP values. Non-proteinuric patients
achieved BP goals significantly more often, than proteinuric ones. Females achieved BP targets more often, than
males. Monotherapy was the most common treatment regimen.

Conclusions. HTN occurs in 70% of patients with CKD and it is controlled in up to 34% of cases. HTN is important
factor of CKD progression and it is closely connected with GFR and proteinuria.

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Keywords

arterial hypertension; chronic kidney disease; primary care

About this article
Title

Analysis of blood pressure control in outpatients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease referred by primary care physicians: a study from the centre of nephrology care

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 23, No 2 (2019)

Pages

88-97

Published online

2019-02-22

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2019.0004

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(2):88-97.

Keywords

arterial hypertension
chronic kidney disease
primary care

Authors

Olexandr Kuryata
Tetiana Yaschenko
Viktor Semenov

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