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Vol 22, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-11-22
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Evaluation of the coexistence of cognitive disorders, leukoaraiosis and other risk factors in patients with stroke

Dawid Mamak, Maciej Horyniecki, Mateusz Rajchel, Kaja Skowronek, Aleksandra Lupa, Justyna Szałajko, Monika Adamczyk-Sowa
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2018.0019
·
Arterial Hypertension 2018;22(4):185-192.

open access

Vol 22, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-11-22

Abstract

Background. Stroke is a common cause of mortality and disability. There are many risk factors for stroke among
which leukoaraiosis (LA) is mentioned. Historically, LA was a radiological term, however, today it is classified as
Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (CSVD) which clinical presentation depends on the affected brain area. Higher prevalence
of LA is found not only in stroke patients, but also in patients with hypertension and other cerebrovascular risk
factors. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the present LA, selected laboratory
tests, the carotid ultrasound markers and cognitive tests results in patients with stroke.

Material and methods. The study included 102 patients (W: 56, M: 46) at the age of 70.9 ± 11.5 hospitalized due
to stroke in the Stroke Unit of the Department of Neurology. The clinical assessment included NIHSS score, MMSE
testing, laboratory blood tests, carotid duplex USG and CT scan of the brain. Patients were dichotomized based on
the presence of LA in the CT scan.

Results. LA was present in 25 (24.5%) patients. It was more frequently found in older patients (> 72 years old;
p < 0.001). In the LA group, higher levels of LDL cholesterol (p = 0.002), lower hemoglobin concentration
(p = 0.03) and higher platelets count (p = 0.04) were observed. The carotid ultrasound showed higher intimamedia
complexes in the LA group (p = 0.02). The functional test showed lower scores on the clock test in patients
with LA (p = 0.04). The presence of LA was three times less likely to be present in patients administered with
beta1-adrenolytics (p = 0.03).

Conclusions. The occurrence of leukoaraiosis in patients with acute stroke is associated with clustering of other
vascular risk factors cognitive impairment, and may be related to ongoing cardiovascular therapy.

Abstract

Background. Stroke is a common cause of mortality and disability. There are many risk factors for stroke among
which leukoaraiosis (LA) is mentioned. Historically, LA was a radiological term, however, today it is classified as
Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (CSVD) which clinical presentation depends on the affected brain area. Higher prevalence
of LA is found not only in stroke patients, but also in patients with hypertension and other cerebrovascular risk
factors. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the present LA, selected laboratory
tests, the carotid ultrasound markers and cognitive tests results in patients with stroke.

Material and methods. The study included 102 patients (W: 56, M: 46) at the age of 70.9 ± 11.5 hospitalized due
to stroke in the Stroke Unit of the Department of Neurology. The clinical assessment included NIHSS score, MMSE
testing, laboratory blood tests, carotid duplex USG and CT scan of the brain. Patients were dichotomized based on
the presence of LA in the CT scan.

Results. LA was present in 25 (24.5%) patients. It was more frequently found in older patients (> 72 years old;
p < 0.001). In the LA group, higher levels of LDL cholesterol (p = 0.002), lower hemoglobin concentration
(p = 0.03) and higher platelets count (p = 0.04) were observed. The carotid ultrasound showed higher intimamedia
complexes in the LA group (p = 0.02). The functional test showed lower scores on the clock test in patients
with LA (p = 0.04). The presence of LA was three times less likely to be present in patients administered with
beta1-adrenolytics (p = 0.03).

Conclusions. The occurrence of leukoaraiosis in patients with acute stroke is associated with clustering of other
vascular risk factors cognitive impairment, and may be related to ongoing cardiovascular therapy.

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Keywords

stroke; leukoaraiosis; Doppler ultrasound; beta1-adrenolytics; clock test

About this article
Title

Evaluation of the coexistence of cognitive disorders, leukoaraiosis and other risk factors in patients with stroke

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 22, No 4 (2018)

Pages

185-192

Published online

2018-11-22

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2018.0019

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2018;22(4):185-192.

Keywords

stroke
leukoaraiosis
Doppler ultrasound
beta1-adrenolytics
clock test

Authors

Dawid Mamak
Maciej Horyniecki
Mateusz Rajchel
Kaja Skowronek
Aleksandra Lupa
Justyna Szałajko
Monika Adamczyk-Sowa

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