open access

Vol 22, No 1 (2018)
Editorial
Published online: 2018-03-30
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Protective effect of nebivolol to prevent target organ damage in hypertension

Krystyna Widecka
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2018.0002
·
Arterial Hypertension 2018;22(1):1-8.

open access

Vol 22, No 1 (2018)
Editorial
Published online: 2018-03-30

Abstract

Cardiovascular complications (left ventricular hypertrophy, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, coronary events, increased arterial stiffness and atherosclerotic lesions) are the major causes of death among patients with hypertension. Oxidative stress and central aortic pressure play a key role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular diseases and complications. Antihypertensive agents may, even within the same class of drugs, exert variable effects on arterial stiffness parameters and endothelial function. Nebivolol is a third-generation β-blocker with vasodilator activity. Its vasodilatory function is mediated by the endothelial L-arginine/NO pathway. Nebivolol increases the bioavailability of NO in the vasculature. Recent studies have demonstrated that nebivolol improves arterial stiffness to a greater extent than conventional β-adrenolytics (atenolol, metoprolol). According to ESH/ESC guidelines, some of the vasodilating β-adrenolytics, such as celiprolol, carvedilol and nebivolol, provide greater reduction in central pulse pressure and aortic stiffness than atenolol or metoprolol.

Abstract

Cardiovascular complications (left ventricular hypertrophy, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, coronary events, increased arterial stiffness and atherosclerotic lesions) are the major causes of death among patients with hypertension. Oxidative stress and central aortic pressure play a key role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular diseases and complications. Antihypertensive agents may, even within the same class of drugs, exert variable effects on arterial stiffness parameters and endothelial function. Nebivolol is a third-generation β-blocker with vasodilator activity. Its vasodilatory function is mediated by the endothelial L-arginine/NO pathway. Nebivolol increases the bioavailability of NO in the vasculature. Recent studies have demonstrated that nebivolol improves arterial stiffness to a greater extent than conventional β-adrenolytics (atenolol, metoprolol). According to ESH/ESC guidelines, some of the vasodilating β-adrenolytics, such as celiprolol, carvedilol and nebivolol, provide greater reduction in central pulse pressure and aortic stiffness than atenolol or metoprolol.

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Keywords

nebivolol, hypertension, target organ damage, central aortic pressure

About this article
Title

Protective effect of nebivolol to prevent target organ damage in hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 22, No 1 (2018)

Pages

1-8

Published online

2018-03-30

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2018.0002

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2018;22(1):1-8.

Keywords

nebivolol
hypertension
target organ damage
central aortic pressure

Authors

Krystyna Widecka

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