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Vol 22, No 1 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-01-24
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Plasma adiponectin in hypertensive patients with and without metabolic syndrome

Anna Brzeska, Marta Sołtysiak, Joanna Ziemak, Tomasz Miazgowski, Krystyna Widecka
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2017.0025
·
Arterial Hypertension 2018;22(1):29-36.

open access

Vol 22, No 1 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-01-24

Abstract

Introduction. The metabolic syndrome is defined on the basis of a cluster of coexisting metabolic deteriorations, which increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Earlier studies suggested a role of adipokines and proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome-induced complications. Some clinical studies reported the association of hypoadiponectinemia with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Decreased adiponectin has been proposed as a useful biomarker of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the study was to compare serum adiponectin levels in patients with primary hypertension with and without coexisting metabolic syndrome.

Material and methods. The study group comprised 145 patients aged 18–50 years with primary hypertension. On the basis of IDF diagnostic criteria, all patients were categorized in groups with (HTMS; n = 73) and without (HTC; n = 72) metabolic syndrome. Study protocol included anthropometric measurements including waist circumference, 24 hour blood pressure measurement, serum levels of adiponectin, uric acid, lipids, insulin and glucose, and assessment of insulin resistance using HOMA-IR index.

Results. The plasma levels of adiponectin were significantly lower in the subjects with hypertension and metabolic syndrome as compared with those without the MS (4.2 ± 3.1 μg/dL vs. 6.7 ± 6.5 μg/dL, p = 0.0026). In all patients with hypertension, adiponectin negatively correlated with insulin (r = −0.20; p = 0.014), HOMA-IR (r = −0.24; p = 0.003), triglycerides (r = −0.19; p = 0.025), uric acid (r = −0.25; p = 0.003) and positively with HDL-cholesterol (r = 0.33; p = 0.0001). In the ROC curve analysis, the cut-off value predicting metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension was 4.1 μg/mL for adiponectin.

Conclusions. In conclusion, low adiponectin levels should be taken into account as a potential non-classical biomarker of metabolic complications in patients with primary hypertension, not only with concomitant metabolic syndrome.

Abstract

Introduction. The metabolic syndrome is defined on the basis of a cluster of coexisting metabolic deteriorations, which increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Earlier studies suggested a role of adipokines and proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome-induced complications. Some clinical studies reported the association of hypoadiponectinemia with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Decreased adiponectin has been proposed as a useful biomarker of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the study was to compare serum adiponectin levels in patients with primary hypertension with and without coexisting metabolic syndrome.

Material and methods. The study group comprised 145 patients aged 18–50 years with primary hypertension. On the basis of IDF diagnostic criteria, all patients were categorized in groups with (HTMS; n = 73) and without (HTC; n = 72) metabolic syndrome. Study protocol included anthropometric measurements including waist circumference, 24 hour blood pressure measurement, serum levels of adiponectin, uric acid, lipids, insulin and glucose, and assessment of insulin resistance using HOMA-IR index.

Results. The plasma levels of adiponectin were significantly lower in the subjects with hypertension and metabolic syndrome as compared with those without the MS (4.2 ± 3.1 μg/dL vs. 6.7 ± 6.5 μg/dL, p = 0.0026). In all patients with hypertension, adiponectin negatively correlated with insulin (r = −0.20; p = 0.014), HOMA-IR (r = −0.24; p = 0.003), triglycerides (r = −0.19; p = 0.025), uric acid (r = −0.25; p = 0.003) and positively with HDL-cholesterol (r = 0.33; p = 0.0001). In the ROC curve analysis, the cut-off value predicting metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension was 4.1 μg/mL for adiponectin.

Conclusions. In conclusion, low adiponectin levels should be taken into account as a potential non-classical biomarker of metabolic complications in patients with primary hypertension, not only with concomitant metabolic syndrome.

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Keywords

adiponectin, primary hypertension, metabolic syndrome

About this article
Title

Plasma adiponectin in hypertensive patients with and without metabolic syndrome

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 22, No 1 (2018)

Pages

29-36

Published online

2018-01-24

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2017.0025

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2018;22(1):29-36.

Keywords

adiponectin
primary hypertension
metabolic syndrome

Authors

Anna Brzeska
Marta Sołtysiak
Joanna Ziemak
Tomasz Miazgowski
Krystyna Widecka

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