open access

Vol 27, No 3 (2023)
Original paper
Published online: 2023-09-27
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Blood pressure control in tertiary-care hypertensive patients during COVID-19 pandemic

Jacek Wolf1, Anna Nieckarz1, Anna Panfil1, Aleksandra Białas1, Julia Sternicka1, Łukasz Jędrzejewski1, Michał Hoffmann1, Anna Szyndler1, Aleksander Prejbisz2, Michel Burnier13, Krzysztof Narkiewicz1
·
Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(3):145-151.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Hypertension and Diabetology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland
  2. Department of Epidemiology, Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases and Health Promotion, National Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland
  3. Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

open access

Vol 27, No 3 (2023)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2023-09-27

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular risk factors distribution during the pandemic suggests worsening of the cardiovascular risk profile of hypertensive patients. At the same time, data on quality of hypertension control during the COVID-19 pandemic are scarce, in Poland. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of blood pressure (BP) control in a group of patients who required regular control in tertiary care.

Material and methods: The study included  patients regularly monitored in Gdańsk Hypertension Centre for at least 4 years with at least 2 visits a year prior the analysis. The size of the group was calculated based on the original data of first 50 consecutive records of patients (power of 90%). Records were retrospectively analysed with respect to office blood pressure (oBP) control. Additionally, within-visit BP variability was calculated (difference of maximum and minimum BP from 3 measurements); body weight, age, sex, duration of hypertension, number of visits per year, seasonal BP variability, use of telemedical services, comorbidities and BP-lowering treatment were recorded.

Results: The study enrolled 220 patients. The values of systolic BP (sBP) before and after the break in the whole group were 135.8 ± 17.1 mm Hg vs. 137.9 ±19.5 mm Hg; P=0.08, and a diastolic BP (dBP) of 80.3 ±11.4 mm Hg vs. 82.6 ±12.2 mm Hg; p = 0.001. After adjusting for seasonal variation of BP, the respective differences were: sBP: 134.8 ± 16.5 vs. 138.0 ± 19.4; p = 0.03, and dBP: 79.4 ±10.9 vs. 82.2 ± 11.9; p = 0.004. Before 2020, 61.4% of patients were controlled (BP < 140/90 mm Hg), whereas after the pandemic-driven break in regular visits the control rate decreased to 55.5% (p = 0.21).

Conclusions: BP increased significantly and the rate of BP control decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic in a group of patients requiring tertiary care for hypertension.

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular risk factors distribution during the pandemic suggests worsening of the cardiovascular risk profile of hypertensive patients. At the same time, data on quality of hypertension control during the COVID-19 pandemic are scarce, in Poland. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of blood pressure (BP) control in a group of patients who required regular control in tertiary care.

Material and methods: The study included  patients regularly monitored in Gdańsk Hypertension Centre for at least 4 years with at least 2 visits a year prior the analysis. The size of the group was calculated based on the original data of first 50 consecutive records of patients (power of 90%). Records were retrospectively analysed with respect to office blood pressure (oBP) control. Additionally, within-visit BP variability was calculated (difference of maximum and minimum BP from 3 measurements); body weight, age, sex, duration of hypertension, number of visits per year, seasonal BP variability, use of telemedical services, comorbidities and BP-lowering treatment were recorded.

Results: The study enrolled 220 patients. The values of systolic BP (sBP) before and after the break in the whole group were 135.8 ± 17.1 mm Hg vs. 137.9 ±19.5 mm Hg; P=0.08, and a diastolic BP (dBP) of 80.3 ±11.4 mm Hg vs. 82.6 ±12.2 mm Hg; p = 0.001. After adjusting for seasonal variation of BP, the respective differences were: sBP: 134.8 ± 16.5 vs. 138.0 ± 19.4; p = 0.03, and dBP: 79.4 ±10.9 vs. 82.2 ± 11.9; p = 0.004. Before 2020, 61.4% of patients were controlled (BP < 140/90 mm Hg), whereas after the pandemic-driven break in regular visits the control rate decreased to 55.5% (p = 0.21).

Conclusions: BP increased significantly and the rate of BP control decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic in a group of patients requiring tertiary care for hypertension.

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Keywords

office blood pressure; COVID-19 pandemic; telemedicine

About this article
Title

Blood pressure control in tertiary-care hypertensive patients during COVID-19 pandemic

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 27, No 3 (2023)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

145-151

Published online

2023-09-27

Page views

347

Article views/downloads

292

DOI

10.5603/ah.97622

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(3):145-151.

Keywords

office blood pressure
COVID-19 pandemic
telemedicine

Authors

Jacek Wolf
Anna Nieckarz
Anna Panfil
Aleksandra Białas
Julia Sternicka
Łukasz Jędrzejewski
Michał Hoffmann
Anna Szyndler
Aleksander Prejbisz
Michel Burnier
Krzysztof Narkiewicz

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