open access

Vol 27, No 4 (2023)
Original paper
Published online: 2023-11-14
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The overall echogenicity (GSM) of carotid intima-media complex shows a positive correlation with arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients

Francesco Natale1, Simona Covino12, Riccardo Molinari12, Mirella Limatola12, Noemi Mollo12, Roberta Alfieri12, Enrica Pezzullo1, Francesco Loffredo12, Paolo Golino12, Giovanni Cimmino23
·
Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(4):232-239.
Affiliations
  1. Vanvitelli Cardiology and Intensive Care Unit, Monaldi Hospital, Naples, Italy
  2. Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy
  3. Cardiology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy

open access

Vol 27, No 4 (2023)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2023-11-14

Abstract

Background: Arterial stiffness measurement still plays a role in prediction of future cardiovascular events, thus helping for quantification of patients’ cardiovascular (CV) risk level. However, significant measurement difficulties still exist, making its widespread evaluation not routinary. At present indices of arterial stiffness have not been associated with qualitative morphological characteristics of intima-media complex. The intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement is no longer recommended in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment due to lack of a standard acquisition protocol. The intima media gray scale median (IM-GSM) is a relatively simple measurement, acquirable during a conventional carotid color-Doppler ultrasound examination. This study aims at investigating the possible relationship between arterial stiffness and echogenicity of IM-GSM of the common carotid arteries, in patients already diagnosed with arterial hypertension.

Material and methods: A total of 421 hypertensive patients were retrospectively selected from our database of hypertension outpatients ambulatory. They were divided into two groups according to IM-GSM values (cutoff value: 30) and then subsequently compared.

Results: In our study population, subjects with IM-GSM > 30 showed a statistically increased arterial stiffness and left ventricle mass index. A weak positive correlation was also found between IM-GSM, systolic blood pressure and duration of hypertension.

Conclusion: The data presented here indicated that the variation of arterial stiffness observed in hypertensive patients is associated with structural modifications in carotid arterial wall. 

Abstract

Background: Arterial stiffness measurement still plays a role in prediction of future cardiovascular events, thus helping for quantification of patients’ cardiovascular (CV) risk level. However, significant measurement difficulties still exist, making its widespread evaluation not routinary. At present indices of arterial stiffness have not been associated with qualitative morphological characteristics of intima-media complex. The intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement is no longer recommended in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment due to lack of a standard acquisition protocol. The intima media gray scale median (IM-GSM) is a relatively simple measurement, acquirable during a conventional carotid color-Doppler ultrasound examination. This study aims at investigating the possible relationship between arterial stiffness and echogenicity of IM-GSM of the common carotid arteries, in patients already diagnosed with arterial hypertension.

Material and methods: A total of 421 hypertensive patients were retrospectively selected from our database of hypertension outpatients ambulatory. They were divided into two groups according to IM-GSM values (cutoff value: 30) and then subsequently compared.

Results: In our study population, subjects with IM-GSM > 30 showed a statistically increased arterial stiffness and left ventricle mass index. A weak positive correlation was also found between IM-GSM, systolic blood pressure and duration of hypertension.

Conclusion: The data presented here indicated that the variation of arterial stiffness observed in hypertensive patients is associated with structural modifications in carotid arterial wall. 

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Keywords

carotid intima-media thickness; hypertension; arterial stiffness; echogenicity of intima-media complex; GSM; PWV

About this article
Title

The overall echogenicity (GSM) of carotid intima-media complex shows a positive correlation with arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 27, No 4 (2023)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

232-239

Published online

2023-11-14

Page views

499

Article views/downloads

157

DOI

10.5603/ah.96896

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(4):232-239.

Keywords

carotid intima-media thickness
hypertension
arterial stiffness
echogenicity of intima-media complex
GSM
PWV

Authors

Francesco Natale
Simona Covino
Riccardo Molinari
Mirella Limatola
Noemi Mollo
Roberta Alfieri
Enrica Pezzullo
Francesco Loffredo
Paolo Golino
Giovanni Cimmino

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