Vol 1, No 3 (1997)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2000-03-08
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End-systolic wall stress as a predictor of regression of left ventricular hypertrophy during antihypertensive therapy

Danuta Czarnecka, Tomasz Grodzicki, Barbara Gryglewska, Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz, Józef Kocemba
Nadciśnienie tętnicze 1997;1(3):106-110.
Vol 1, No 3 (1997)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2000-03-08

Abstract


Background Hypertensio-induced left ventricular hypertrophy and its regression under the influence of antihypertensive therapy depend on a variety of factors.
Methods A group of 14 hypertensives over 60 years of age with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVMI > 134 g/m2 was receiving nifedipine in a mean dose of 45.2 mg/day. After 4 years of theraphy 2D and M-mode echocardiography revealed regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in 8 patients (group I), and further increase of left ventricular mass in 6 patients (group II).
Results Initial systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) did not show significant unter-group differences. After 4 years of nifedipine therapy blood pressure decrease was similar in both groups. LVMI decreased in group I in contrast to group II, where it showed further increase. In group I initially significantly higher end-systolic wall stress decreased significantly after therapy; ejection fraction showed a significant increase. In group II end-systolic wall stress and ejection fraction did not change significaantly.
Conclusions Despite a comparable hypotensive effect after 4-year nifedipine therapy regression of left ventricular hypertrophy was observed only in the patients with higher initial end-systolic wall stress. Regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in the elderly was associated with improved systolic function. The present findings imply that the magnitude of end-systolic wall stress may be predictor of hypotensive effect.

Abstract


Background Hypertensio-induced left ventricular hypertrophy and its regression under the influence of antihypertensive therapy depend on a variety of factors.
Methods A group of 14 hypertensives over 60 years of age with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVMI > 134 g/m2 was receiving nifedipine in a mean dose of 45.2 mg/day. After 4 years of theraphy 2D and M-mode echocardiography revealed regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in 8 patients (group I), and further increase of left ventricular mass in 6 patients (group II).
Results Initial systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) did not show significant unter-group differences. After 4 years of nifedipine therapy blood pressure decrease was similar in both groups. LVMI decreased in group I in contrast to group II, where it showed further increase. In group I initially significantly higher end-systolic wall stress decreased significantly after therapy; ejection fraction showed a significant increase. In group II end-systolic wall stress and ejection fraction did not change significaantly.
Conclusions Despite a comparable hypotensive effect after 4-year nifedipine therapy regression of left ventricular hypertrophy was observed only in the patients with higher initial end-systolic wall stress. Regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in the elderly was associated with improved systolic function. The present findings imply that the magnitude of end-systolic wall stress may be predictor of hypotensive effect.
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Keywords

elderly; left ventricular systolic function; nifedipine

About this article
Title

End-systolic wall stress as a predictor of regression of left ventricular hypertrophy during antihypertensive therapy

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 1, No 3 (1997)

Pages

106-110

Published online

2000-03-08

Bibliographic record

Nadciśnienie tętnicze 1997;1(3):106-110.

Keywords

elderly
left ventricular systolic function
nifedipine

Authors

Danuta Czarnecka
Tomasz Grodzicki
Barbara Gryglewska
Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz
Józef Kocemba

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