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Vol 3, No 4 (1999)
REVIEV
Published online: 2000-03-09
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Rare Causes of Hypertension

Andrzej Januszewicz, Cezary Szmigielski, Izabela Łoń
Nadciśnienie tętnicze 1999;3(4):251-256.

open access

Vol 3, No 4 (1999)
REVIEV
Published online: 2000-03-09

Abstract

There are some forms of hypertension which despite rare occurrence should be included in the diagnosis of hypertension. Some of them have potentially reversible causes. In some cases early and appropriate treatment allow to avoid dangerous complications. Primary reninism is a potentially reversible cause of severe, secondary hypertension. In the patients with the juxtaglomerular cells tumours increased secretion of renin Leads to increased aldosterone secretion. The surgical resection of the tumour is the treatment of choice. Hemangioendothelioma, a tumour secreting endothelin, which is a potent vasoconstrictor, is a very rare cause of hypertension. Gordon's syndrome is a rare hereditary disorder with hypertension, hyperkaliemia, hyperchloremia and acidemia with normal glomerular filtration rate. Severe hyperkaliemia is the most persistent feature of this syndrome. Glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is a hereditary, autosomal dominant disease with hypertension. The treatment with dexamethasone normalises blood pressure and metabolic disturbances. Liddle's syndrome, known as pseudohyperaldosteronism is a rare hereditary, autosomal dominant tubulopathy. Hypertension is caused by an increase in fluid retention and hypervolemia. The treatment of choice is a sodium-depleted diet combined with amiloride or triamteren.

Abstract

There are some forms of hypertension which despite rare occurrence should be included in the diagnosis of hypertension. Some of them have potentially reversible causes. In some cases early and appropriate treatment allow to avoid dangerous complications. Primary reninism is a potentially reversible cause of severe, secondary hypertension. In the patients with the juxtaglomerular cells tumours increased secretion of renin Leads to increased aldosterone secretion. The surgical resection of the tumour is the treatment of choice. Hemangioendothelioma, a tumour secreting endothelin, which is a potent vasoconstrictor, is a very rare cause of hypertension. Gordon's syndrome is a rare hereditary disorder with hypertension, hyperkaliemia, hyperchloremia and acidemia with normal glomerular filtration rate. Severe hyperkaliemia is the most persistent feature of this syndrome. Glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is a hereditary, autosomal dominant disease with hypertension. The treatment with dexamethasone normalises blood pressure and metabolic disturbances. Liddle's syndrome, known as pseudohyperaldosteronism is a rare hereditary, autosomal dominant tubulopathy. Hypertension is caused by an increase in fluid retention and hypervolemia. The treatment of choice is a sodium-depleted diet combined with amiloride or triamteren.
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Keywords

hypertension secondary; reninism primary; Gordon' s syndrome; hyperaldosteronism; Liddle' s syndrome

About this article
Title

Rare Causes of Hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 3, No 4 (1999)

Pages

251-256

Published online

2000-03-09

Bibliographic record

Nadciśnienie tętnicze 1999;3(4):251-256.

Keywords

hypertension secondary
reninism primary
Gordon's syndrome
hyperaldosteronism
Liddle's syndrome

Authors

Andrzej Januszewicz
Cezary Szmigielski
Izabela Łoń

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