open access

Vol 5, No 1 (2001)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2001-01-12
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6. Relationship between Insulin Resistance and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Essential Hypertension

Anna Boruczkowska, Olga Trojnarska, Beata Krasińska
Nadciśnienie tętnicze 2001;5(1):47-54.

open access

Vol 5, No 1 (2001)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2001-01-12

Abstract

Background: Insulin resistance is a often phenomenon what can be observed in hypertensive patients. Relationship between insulin resistance and hypertension is not clear. In hypertension left ventricular presse overload induces it’s hypertrophy. The aim of the study was to find out a relationship between insulin resistance and left ventricular mass in patients with essential hypertension.

Material and methods: The study population consisted of 30 non-obese patients with a mean age 43,6 ± 6,6 with mild and moderate hypertension. Left ventricular mass was evaluated with M.-mode echocardiografy and indexed for body size according to Devereux. Insulin resistance was determined by means of euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp technique according to De Fronzo.

Results: Left ventricular hypertrophy was observed in 43,3% patients. LVMI was correlated with SBP (r = 0,45; p < 0,05), DBP (r = 0,47; p < 0,05) and duration of disease (r = 0,53; p < 0,01). M.-value-mediated glucose uptake was statisticaly lower in patients with LVH/(239,40 ± 32,01 vs. 314,41 ± ± 34,80 mg/(m2 · min), (p < 0,001)/M.-value correlated with SBP (r = –0,76; p < 0,001), DBP (r = –0,77; p < 0,001) and BMI (r = –0,59; p < 0,001) examinated patients. Left ventricular mass index was correlated with glucose uptake — M.-value (r = –0,48; p < 0,01).

Conclusions: Significant correlations between SBP, DBP, duration of disease and LVMI are connected with LVH. This study revealed association between insulin resistence and left ventricular mass. As more insulin resistance the higher LVMI.

Abstract

Background: Insulin resistance is a often phenomenon what can be observed in hypertensive patients. Relationship between insulin resistance and hypertension is not clear. In hypertension left ventricular presse overload induces it’s hypertrophy. The aim of the study was to find out a relationship between insulin resistance and left ventricular mass in patients with essential hypertension.

Material and methods: The study population consisted of 30 non-obese patients with a mean age 43,6 ± 6,6 with mild and moderate hypertension. Left ventricular mass was evaluated with M.-mode echocardiografy and indexed for body size according to Devereux. Insulin resistance was determined by means of euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp technique according to De Fronzo.

Results: Left ventricular hypertrophy was observed in 43,3% patients. LVMI was correlated with SBP (r = 0,45; p < 0,05), DBP (r = 0,47; p < 0,05) and duration of disease (r = 0,53; p < 0,01). M.-value-mediated glucose uptake was statisticaly lower in patients with LVH/(239,40 ± 32,01 vs. 314,41 ± ± 34,80 mg/(m2 · min), (p < 0,001)/M.-value correlated with SBP (r = –0,76; p < 0,001), DBP (r = –0,77; p < 0,001) and BMI (r = –0,59; p < 0,001) examinated patients. Left ventricular mass index was correlated with glucose uptake — M.-value (r = –0,48; p < 0,01).

Conclusions: Significant correlations between SBP, DBP, duration of disease and LVMI are connected with LVH. This study revealed association between insulin resistence and left ventricular mass. As more insulin resistance the higher LVMI.

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Keywords

insulin resistence; left ventricular hypertrophy; hypertension

About this article
Title

6. Relationship between Insulin Resistance and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Essential Hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 5, No 1 (2001)

Pages

47-54

Published online

2001-01-12

Bibliographic record

Nadciśnienie tętnicze 2001;5(1):47-54.

Keywords

insulin resistence
left ventricular hypertrophy
hypertension

Authors

Anna Boruczkowska
Olga Trojnarska
Beata Krasińska

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