open access

Vol 12, No 5 (2008)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2008-10-12
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Relation between clinical and biochemical variables and uric acid in essential hypertension

Marek Jastrzębski, Marek Klocek, Danuta Czarnecka, Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz
Nadciśnienie tętnicze 2008;12(5):352-358.

open access

Vol 12, No 5 (2008)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2008-10-12

Abstract

Background Hyperuricemia was shown to be associated with high blood pressure and risk for cardiovascular disease in large studies. However, it is not known if this relates to a worse clinical and biochemical profile of hypertensives with higher uric acid (UA) levels treated in a specialized center.
Material and methods 119 consecutive patients with moderate (16%) and severe (84%) primary hypertension entered the study. UA, serum creatinine, lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), left ventricular diastolic function (IVRT) and the antihypertensive treatment were assessed.
Results In univariate analysis UA correlated with creatinine (r = 0,46, p < 0,001), waist-hip ratio (r = 0,45, p < 0,001), HDL cholesterol (r = –0,39, p < 0,001) and also isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT), IMT, LVMI, CRP, TNF-α. In multiple regression analysis UA independently correlated only with waist-hip ratio, CRP and creatinine. The patients with UA in upper quartile (> 402 μmol/l) as compared to lower quartile had higher LVMI (by 36 g/m2), IMT (by 0,1 mm), prolonged IVRT (by 11 ms), higher CRP and triglicerides and lower HDL cholesterol levels and required more antihypertensive drugs for blood pressure control.
Conclusions Higher level of uric acid in hypertensives designates patients with worse clinical and biochemical profile including presence of other components of metabolic syndrome and subclinical target organ damage.

Abstract

Background Hyperuricemia was shown to be associated with high blood pressure and risk for cardiovascular disease in large studies. However, it is not known if this relates to a worse clinical and biochemical profile of hypertensives with higher uric acid (UA) levels treated in a specialized center.
Material and methods 119 consecutive patients with moderate (16%) and severe (84%) primary hypertension entered the study. UA, serum creatinine, lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), left ventricular diastolic function (IVRT) and the antihypertensive treatment were assessed.
Results In univariate analysis UA correlated with creatinine (r = 0,46, p < 0,001), waist-hip ratio (r = 0,45, p < 0,001), HDL cholesterol (r = –0,39, p < 0,001) and also isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT), IMT, LVMI, CRP, TNF-α. In multiple regression analysis UA independently correlated only with waist-hip ratio, CRP and creatinine. The patients with UA in upper quartile (> 402 μmol/l) as compared to lower quartile had higher LVMI (by 36 g/m2), IMT (by 0,1 mm), prolonged IVRT (by 11 ms), higher CRP and triglicerides and lower HDL cholesterol levels and required more antihypertensive drugs for blood pressure control.
Conclusions Higher level of uric acid in hypertensives designates patients with worse clinical and biochemical profile including presence of other components of metabolic syndrome and subclinical target organ damage.
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Keywords

arterial hypertension; uric acid; target organ damage; chronic inflammation

About this article
Title

Relation between clinical and biochemical variables and uric acid in essential hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 12, No 5 (2008)

Pages

352-358

Published online

2008-10-12

Bibliographic record

Nadciśnienie tętnicze 2008;12(5):352-358.

Keywords

arterial hypertension
uric acid
target organ damage
chronic inflammation

Authors

Marek Jastrzębski
Marek Klocek
Danuta Czarnecka
Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz

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