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Vol 17 (2019): Continuous Publishing
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Analiza wybranych czynników psychospołecznych i psychopatologicznych u sprawców zgwałceń i czynów pedofilnych w świetle opiniowania sądowego

Dariusz Juszczak, Piotr Oglaza, Krzysztof Korzeniewski
Seksuologia Polska 2019;17:1-15.

Abstract

WSTĘP: Problematyka czynników wpływających na popełnianie zgwałceń i czynów pedofilnych jest złożona. Nie wypracowano dotychczas teorii całościowo tłumaczących tego typu zachowania przestępcze. MATERIAŁ I METODY: Celem pracy była ocena, które czynniki psychospołeczne i psychopatologiczne są charakterystyczne dla sprawców zgwałceń (dorosłych i małoletnich) i czynów pedofilnych. Materiał badawczy stanowiły 180 opinie sądowe, psychiatryczno-seksuologiczne, wydane przez biegłych Przychodni Zdrowia Psychicznego 10 Wojskowego Szpitala Klinicznego w Bydgoszczy. Opinie te wydawano osobom, które popełniły przestępstwa seksualne (rozdz. XXV polskiego Kodeksu Karnego: „Przestępstwa przeciwko wolności seksualnej i obyczajności”). Wykorzystano stworzony na potrzeby badania kwestionariusz zatytułowany „Karta badania czynników determinujących seksualne zachowania przestępcze”. WYNIKI: Zaobserwowano istotne statystycznie różnice pomiędzy badanymi grupami. WNIOSKI: 1. Zgwałcenia dorosłych i małoletnich cechują się podobnymi uwarunkowaniami w zakresie badanych czynników psychospołecznych i psychopatologicznych. 2. Wykazano istotną różnicę pomiędzy zgwałceniami małoletnich a czynami pedofilnymi w zakresie badanych czynników.

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Journal of Sexual and Mental Health