open access

Vol 25, No 2 (2020)
Original research articles
Published online: 2020-03-01
Submitted: 2019-10-17
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Secondary brain tumors after cranial radiation therapy: A single-institution study

Masazumi Fujii, Masahiro Ichikawa, Kensho Iwatate, Mudathir Bakhit, Masayuki Yamada, Yosuke Kuromi, Taku Sato, Jun Sakuma, Hisashi Sato, Atsushi Kikuta, Yoshiyuki Suzuki, Kiyoshi Saito
DOI: 10.1016/j.rpor.2020.01.009
·
Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2020;25(2):245-249.

open access

Vol 25, No 2 (2020)
Original research articles
Published online: 2020-03-01
Submitted: 2019-10-17

Abstract

Aim

To study the probability of developing secondary brain tumors after cranial radiotherapy.

Background Patients treated with cranial radiotherapy are at risk for developing secondary brain tumors.

Patients and methods

We planned an institutional survey for secondary brain tumors in survivors after cranial irradiation and reviewed the 30-year duration data. Event analysis and cumulative proportion curves were performed to generally estimate the cumulative proportion of developing secondary brain tumors, cavernoma and meningioma at different periods of time.

Results

Secondary brain tumors occurred in 21% of cases: 10% were cavernomas, 6% were meningiomas, 3% were skull osteomas, and 1% were anaplastic astrocytoma. The cumulative proportion of developing secondary brain tumor was 6% at 10 years and 20% at 20 years, while the cumulative proportion for developing cavernomas and meningiomas was 16% and 7% at 20 years, respectively.

Conclusion

Our study shows that patients who received cranial irradiation were at risk of secondary brain tumors such as cavernomas and meningiomas. Thus, a meticulous follow-up of cancer survivors with history of cranial irradiation by an annual MRI scan is justifiable. This will help clinicians to detect secondary brain tumors early and make its management much easier.

Abstract

Aim

To study the probability of developing secondary brain tumors after cranial radiotherapy.

Background Patients treated with cranial radiotherapy are at risk for developing secondary brain tumors.

Patients and methods

We planned an institutional survey for secondary brain tumors in survivors after cranial irradiation and reviewed the 30-year duration data. Event analysis and cumulative proportion curves were performed to generally estimate the cumulative proportion of developing secondary brain tumors, cavernoma and meningioma at different periods of time.

Results

Secondary brain tumors occurred in 21% of cases: 10% were cavernomas, 6% were meningiomas, 3% were skull osteomas, and 1% were anaplastic astrocytoma. The cumulative proportion of developing secondary brain tumor was 6% at 10 years and 20% at 20 years, while the cumulative proportion for developing cavernomas and meningiomas was 16% and 7% at 20 years, respectively.

Conclusion

Our study shows that patients who received cranial irradiation were at risk of secondary brain tumors such as cavernomas and meningiomas. Thus, a meticulous follow-up of cancer survivors with history of cranial irradiation by an annual MRI scan is justifiable. This will help clinicians to detect secondary brain tumors early and make its management much easier.

Get Citation

Keywords

Cranial radiation; Meningioma; Glioma; Cavernoma

About this article
Title

Secondary brain tumors after cranial radiation therapy: A single-institution study

Journal

Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

Issue

Vol 25, No 2 (2020)

Pages

245-249

Published online

2020-03-01

DOI

10.1016/j.rpor.2020.01.009

Bibliographic record

Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2020;25(2):245-249.

Keywords

Cranial radiation
Meningioma
Glioma
Cavernoma

Authors

Masazumi Fujii
Masahiro Ichikawa
Kensho Iwatate
Mudathir Bakhit
Masayuki Yamada
Yosuke Kuromi
Taku Sato
Jun Sakuma
Hisashi Sato
Atsushi Kikuta
Yoshiyuki Suzuki
Kiyoshi Saito

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