open access

Vol 23, No 1 (2018)
Original research articles
Published online: 2018-01-01
Submitted: 2017-03-27
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Morbidity dynamics in proton–photon or photon radiation therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

Evgeny V. Khmelevsky, Irina N. Kancheli, Vladimir S. Khoroshkov, Andrey D. Kaprin
DOI: 10.1016/j.rpor.2017.11.001
·
Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2018;23(1):21-27.

open access

Vol 23, No 1 (2018)
Original research articles
Published online: 2018-01-01
Submitted: 2017-03-27

Abstract

Aim

This study evaluated the frequency and long-term dynamics of early and late post irradiation damage after proton–photon or photon therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer.

Background

The results of a randomized study of proton–photon or photon therapy using several fractionation regimes were analyzed in 272 patients with high and intermediate risk of progression.

Materials and methods

Three variants of proton boost fractionation were studied sequentially: 3.0 (8 daily fractions), 4.0 (5 fractions, 3 or 5 fractions/week), and 5.5 (3 fractions, 3 fractions/week) Gy(RBE).

Results

A significant decrease in the severity of both acute and late gastrointestinal injuries is achievable with a proton beam. The dynamics of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity over a 10-year period were generally characterized by a decrease in severity of morbidity by 30% and 15%, respectively.

Conclusions

Local irradiation with a fractional dose of 3.0–5.5[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy(RBE) and a cumulative dose of 28.0–28.8[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy(RBE) for protons significantly reduces the early and late rectitis severity, but does not reduce the risk of lower urinary tract injuries. Fractionation regimens do not significantly differ in toxicity levels.

Abstract

Aim

This study evaluated the frequency and long-term dynamics of early and late post irradiation damage after proton–photon or photon therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer.

Background

The results of a randomized study of proton–photon or photon therapy using several fractionation regimes were analyzed in 272 patients with high and intermediate risk of progression.

Materials and methods

Three variants of proton boost fractionation were studied sequentially: 3.0 (8 daily fractions), 4.0 (5 fractions, 3 or 5 fractions/week), and 5.5 (3 fractions, 3 fractions/week) Gy(RBE).

Results

A significant decrease in the severity of both acute and late gastrointestinal injuries is achievable with a proton beam. The dynamics of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity over a 10-year period were generally characterized by a decrease in severity of morbidity by 30% and 15%, respectively.

Conclusions

Local irradiation with a fractional dose of 3.0–5.5[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy(RBE) and a cumulative dose of 28.0–28.8[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy(RBE) for protons significantly reduces the early and late rectitis severity, but does not reduce the risk of lower urinary tract injuries. Fractionation regimens do not significantly differ in toxicity levels.

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Keywords

Prostate cancer; Radiation therapy; Protons; Hypofractionation; Toxicity

About this article
Title

Morbidity dynamics in proton–photon or photon radiation therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

Journal

Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

Issue

Vol 23, No 1 (2018)

Pages

21-27

Published online

2018-01-01

DOI

10.1016/j.rpor.2017.11.001

Bibliographic record

Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2018;23(1):21-27.

Keywords

Prostate cancer
Radiation therapy
Protons
Hypofractionation
Toxicity

Authors

Evgeny V. Khmelevsky
Irina N. Kancheli
Vladimir S. Khoroshkov
Andrey D. Kaprin

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