open access

Vol 22, No 2 (2017)
Special Issue Papers
Published online: 2017-03-01
Submitted: 2015-08-02
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Image guided SBRT for multiple liver metastases with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating

Carmen Rubio, Ovidio Hernando-Requejo, Daniel Zucca Aparicio, María ALlona Krauel, Mercedes López Gonzalez, Juan María Pérez, Emilio Sánchez Saugar, Pedro Fernández Letón
DOI: 10.1016/j.rpor.2016.07.006
·
Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2017;22(2):150-157.

open access

Vol 22, No 2 (2017)
Special Issue Papers
Published online: 2017-03-01
Submitted: 2015-08-02

Abstract

Aim

To report the outcome and toxicity of sequential stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for multiple liver metastases in patients treated with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating.

Background

In selected patients with a limited number of liver metastases, SBRT has been evaluated as a safe and effective treatment, with minimal toxicity and high rates of local control.

Materials and methods

From April 2008 to October 2013, 21 patients with multiple (3–14) liver metastases (n[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]=[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]101) were treated sequentially with SBRT at our institution. Maximum tumor diameter was 7.5[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]cm. Prior to treatment, internal markers were placed inside or near the tumor. CT or PET-CT simulation was used for the definition of gross tumor volume (GTV). Median planning target volume was 32.3[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]cc (3.6–139.3[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]cc). Treatment consisted of 3 fractions (12–20[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy/fraction) or 5 fractions (10[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy/fraction), prescribed to the 90–95% of the PTV volume. Daily intra-fraction image guidance was performed with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating. Regular follow-up included CT or PET-CT imaging.

Results

After a median of 23.2 months, the estimated local control rate was 94.4%, 80.6%, 65% and 65% after 1, 2, 3 and 4 years; the median overall survival was 62 months (95% CI 49.12–74.87) and the actuarial survival reached at 60 months was 57.6%. The univariate data analysis revealed that only primary histology other than colorectal adenocarcinoma was shown as an independent significant prognostic factor for local control (p[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]=[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]0.022). Number of treated metastases did not modify significantly the overall survival (p[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]=[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]0.51). No toxicity higher than G3 (1 patient with chest wall pain) and no radiation-induced liver disease were observed.

Conclusions

Sequential SBRT with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating for multiple liver metastases can be considered an effective, safe therapeutic option, with a low treatment-related toxicity. Excellent rates of local control and survival were obtained.

Abstract

Aim

To report the outcome and toxicity of sequential stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for multiple liver metastases in patients treated with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating.

Background

In selected patients with a limited number of liver metastases, SBRT has been evaluated as a safe and effective treatment, with minimal toxicity and high rates of local control.

Materials and methods

From April 2008 to October 2013, 21 patients with multiple (3–14) liver metastases (n[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]=[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]101) were treated sequentially with SBRT at our institution. Maximum tumor diameter was 7.5[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]cm. Prior to treatment, internal markers were placed inside or near the tumor. CT or PET-CT simulation was used for the definition of gross tumor volume (GTV). Median planning target volume was 32.3[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]cc (3.6–139.3[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]cc). Treatment consisted of 3 fractions (12–20[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy/fraction) or 5 fractions (10[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]Gy/fraction), prescribed to the 90–95% of the PTV volume. Daily intra-fraction image guidance was performed with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating. Regular follow-up included CT or PET-CT imaging.

Results

After a median of 23.2 months, the estimated local control rate was 94.4%, 80.6%, 65% and 65% after 1, 2, 3 and 4 years; the median overall survival was 62 months (95% CI 49.12–74.87) and the actuarial survival reached at 60 months was 57.6%. The univariate data analysis revealed that only primary histology other than colorectal adenocarcinoma was shown as an independent significant prognostic factor for local control (p[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]=[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]0.022). Number of treated metastases did not modify significantly the overall survival (p[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]=[[ce:hsp sp="0.25"/]]0.51). No toxicity higher than G3 (1 patient with chest wall pain) and no radiation-induced liver disease were observed.

Conclusions

Sequential SBRT with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating for multiple liver metastases can be considered an effective, safe therapeutic option, with a low treatment-related toxicity. Excellent rates of local control and survival were obtained.

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Keywords

SBRT; Liver metastases; Gating; ExacTrac

About this article
Title

Image guided SBRT for multiple liver metastases with ExacTrac Adaptive Gating

Journal

Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

Issue

Vol 22, No 2 (2017)

Pages

150-157

Published online

2017-03-01

DOI

10.1016/j.rpor.2016.07.006

Bibliographic record

Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2017;22(2):150-157.

Keywords

SBRT
Liver metastases
Gating
ExacTrac

Authors

Carmen Rubio
Ovidio Hernando-Requejo
Daniel Zucca Aparicio
María ALlona Krauel
Mercedes López Gonzalez
Juan María Pérez
Emilio Sánchez Saugar
Pedro Fernández Letón

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