open access

Vol 14, No 2 (2021)
Guidelines / Expert consensus
Published online: 2021-12-31
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Low-protein diets and ketoanalogues of amino acids in the treatment of chronic kidney disease — position of the Executive Board of the Polish Society of Nephrology

Sylwia Małgorzewicz1, Beata Naumnik2, Andrzej Oko3, Przemysław Rutkowski4, Ryszard Gellert5
Renal Disease and Transplantation Forum 2021;14(2):53-57.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Clinical Nutrition, Medical University of Gdańsk
  2. Department of Nephrology and Transplantology with Dialysis Unit, Medical University of Bialystok
  3. Clinical Department of Nephrology, Transplantology and Internal Medicine, Poznań University of Medical Science
  4. Division of Internal and Pediatric Nursing, Medical University of Gdańsk
  5. Department of Nephrology and Internal Medicine, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education

open access

Vol 14, No 2 (2021)
Recommendations, Standards and Opinions
Published online: 2021-12-31

Abstract

The NKF DOQI (The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) recommendations from 2020 advice the use in patientswith chronic kidney disease (CKD) 3–5 without diabetes, in a stable metabolic state and under strict medical care, a diet with a protein amount of 0.55–0.6 g/kg/day The use of low-protein with or without ketoanalogues of amino acid reduces the risk of end-stage renal disease. The constantly growing number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, the high costs of dialysis therapy and the lack of beneficial effects of early qualification for dialysis on the prognosis of patients cause a renewed interest in the use of low-protein diets with the hope of prolongation conservative treatment. The position of the Polish Society of Nephrology, based on global recommendations and current scientific research results, recommends the use of low-protein diets and amino acid ketanalogues in patients with CKD as part of conservative treatment in a group of patients in good clinical condition, who have no contraindications for this type of proceeding.

Abstract

The NKF DOQI (The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) recommendations from 2020 advice the use in patientswith chronic kidney disease (CKD) 3–5 without diabetes, in a stable metabolic state and under strict medical care, a diet with a protein amount of 0.55–0.6 g/kg/day The use of low-protein with or without ketoanalogues of amino acid reduces the risk of end-stage renal disease. The constantly growing number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, the high costs of dialysis therapy and the lack of beneficial effects of early qualification for dialysis on the prognosis of patients cause a renewed interest in the use of low-protein diets with the hope of prolongation conservative treatment. The position of the Polish Society of Nephrology, based on global recommendations and current scientific research results, recommends the use of low-protein diets and amino acid ketanalogues in patients with CKD as part of conservative treatment in a group of patients in good clinical condition, who have no contraindications for this type of proceeding.

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Keywords

low-protein diets, chronic kidney disease, conservative treatment, ketoanalogues of amino acid

About this article
Title

Low-protein diets and ketoanalogues of amino acids in the treatment of chronic kidney disease — position of the Executive Board of the Polish Society of Nephrology

Journal

Renal Disease and Transplantation Forum

Issue

Vol 14, No 2 (2021)

Article type

Guidelines / Expert consensus

Pages

53-57

Published online

2021-12-31

Bibliographic record

Renal Disease and Transplantation Forum 2021;14(2):53-57.

Keywords

low-protein diets
chronic kidney disease
conservative treatment
ketoanalogues of amino acid

Authors

Sylwia Małgorzewicz
Beata Naumnik
Andrzej Oko
Przemysław Rutkowski
Ryszard Gellert

References (27)
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