open access

Vol 17, No 3 (2020)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-07-07
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Shinrin-yoku and forest therapy: review of the literature

Katarzyna Simonienko, Martyna Jakubowska, Beata Konarzewska
DOI: 10.5603/PSYCH.2020.0022
·
Psychiatria 2020;17(3):145-154.

open access

Vol 17, No 3 (2020)
Prace poglądowe - nadesłane
Published online: 2020-07-07

Abstract

Forest therapy and shinrin-yoku are concepts that have been appearing more and more often in the literature on the
prevention of stress and immune disorders for over a dozen years. In the context of research, it can be said that it plays an
important role not only in the prevention of somatic civilization diseases, such as hypertension or diabetes, but also protects
against development and helps in the treatment of mental disorders from the group of anxiety-depressive disorders.
In the “Pub Med” database, the search terms “shinrin-yoku” were entered, 23 results and “forest bathing”, 90 results,
of which 18 were rejected after repetitive and unrelated searches. Only original papers were analysed (30).
Forest therapy eliminates the effects of stress caused by numerous external factors generated by lifestyle in an urbanized
environment and, for example, by overworking. It increases immunity, affecting, among others on the amount
and activity of NK cells, it has a positive effect on metabolic parameters in ischemic heart disease and hypertension.
It supports relaxation, attention and convalescence after stress. In Asian countries, it is an official branch of medicine,
which is dedicated to profiled medical centers. In European countries we often meet conferences dedicated to forest
therapies and specialized trainings.
Forest therapy is a well-documented therapeutic method that can be used in the prevention, support of treatment and
rehabilitation of stress disorders and civilization diseases.

Abstract

Forest therapy and shinrin-yoku are concepts that have been appearing more and more often in the literature on the
prevention of stress and immune disorders for over a dozen years. In the context of research, it can be said that it plays an
important role not only in the prevention of somatic civilization diseases, such as hypertension or diabetes, but also protects
against development and helps in the treatment of mental disorders from the group of anxiety-depressive disorders.
In the “Pub Med” database, the search terms “shinrin-yoku” were entered, 23 results and “forest bathing”, 90 results,
of which 18 were rejected after repetitive and unrelated searches. Only original papers were analysed (30).
Forest therapy eliminates the effects of stress caused by numerous external factors generated by lifestyle in an urbanized
environment and, for example, by overworking. It increases immunity, affecting, among others on the amount
and activity of NK cells, it has a positive effect on metabolic parameters in ischemic heart disease and hypertension.
It supports relaxation, attention and convalescence after stress. In Asian countries, it is an official branch of medicine,
which is dedicated to profiled medical centers. In European countries we often meet conferences dedicated to forest
therapies and specialized trainings.
Forest therapy is a well-documented therapeutic method that can be used in the prevention, support of treatment and
rehabilitation of stress disorders and civilization diseases.

Get Citation

Keywords

complementary therapies, forest, climatotherapy, nature therapy, ecotherapy

About this article
Title

Shinrin-yoku and forest therapy: review of the literature

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 17, No 3 (2020)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

145-154

Published online

2020-07-07

DOI

10.5603/PSYCH.2020.0022

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2020;17(3):145-154.

Keywords

complementary therapies
forest
climatotherapy
nature therapy
ecotherapy

Authors

Katarzyna Simonienko
Martyna Jakubowska
Beata Konarzewska

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