open access

Vol 16, No 4 (2019)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2019-10-30
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Mindfulness: an upward spiral process to combat depression

Raghavendra Sode, Kalaa Chenji
Psychiatria 2019;16(4):178-184.

open access

Vol 16, No 4 (2019)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2019-10-30

Abstract

Many studies proved detrimental effects of depression at the workplace in terms of reducing employee performance, increased absenteeism and other psychological, physical and mental distress. Organizations are driving specific interventions and training services to reduce potential negative outcomes of depression (Holmes, 2016; Utley, 2018) and one such intervention that needs to be researched is mindfulness (Bear, 2003). The proposed model intends to examine the role of mindfulness in reducing depression. The model proved that change in mindfulness significantly brings change in positive reappraisal and depression. Further positive reappraisal partially mediates the relationship between mindfulness and depression and the change in rumination does not decrease depression. By implementing mindfulness programmes, managers could make a significant difference and help employees to fight depression. Mindfulness develops into a resource over a period of time and helps employees to be engaged in the work, increase their performance, job satisfaction, productivity, and develop overall wellbeing.

Abstract

Many studies proved detrimental effects of depression at the workplace in terms of reducing employee performance, increased absenteeism and other psychological, physical and mental distress. Organizations are driving specific interventions and training services to reduce potential negative outcomes of depression (Holmes, 2016; Utley, 2018) and one such intervention that needs to be researched is mindfulness (Bear, 2003). The proposed model intends to examine the role of mindfulness in reducing depression. The model proved that change in mindfulness significantly brings change in positive reappraisal and depression. Further positive reappraisal partially mediates the relationship between mindfulness and depression and the change in rumination does not decrease depression. By implementing mindfulness programmes, managers could make a significant difference and help employees to fight depression. Mindfulness develops into a resource over a period of time and helps employees to be engaged in the work, increase their performance, job satisfaction, productivity, and develop overall wellbeing.
Get Citation

Keywords

mindfulness, positive reappraisal, rumination, and depression

About this article
Title

Mindfulness: an upward spiral process to combat depression

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 16, No 4 (2019)

Pages

178-184

Published online

2019-10-30

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2019;16(4):178-184.

Keywords

mindfulness
positive reappraisal
rumination
and depression

Authors

Raghavendra Sode
Kalaa Chenji

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