open access

Vol 16, No 1 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-01-02
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Development of the cancer-patient social support questionnaire: reliability and validity

Katarzyna Sanna, Lidia Cierpiałkowska, Paweł Kleka, Marta Stelmach-Madras, Dariusz Iżycki
Psychiatria 2019;16(1):8-15.

open access

Vol 16, No 1 (2019)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2019-01-02

Abstract

Introduction: Social support is an important mediator between disease and psychological adjustment, both for the patient, as well as for the family members. The aim of the study was to develop the self-reported Patient-Caregiver Social Support Questionnaire (KWPO) and assess the initial reliability and validity of this tool. Material and methods: A total of 102 cancer-caregiver dyads completed the KWPO. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were analyzed. Results: Reliability of the KWPO can be considered satisfactory with a Cronbach’s alpha ranging from 0.89 to 0.923. The mean Content Validity Ratio ranged between 0.85 to 0.92. A four-factor model with the multidimensional aspect of the construct in social support was supported. The fit indices of CFA non-hierarchical model for a flat model was eligible in the goodness of fit index (GFI) (0.943–0.982), the adjusted goodness of fit index (AGFI) (0.921–0.975), the comparative fit index (CFI) (0.703–0.968) and Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) (0.656–0.963) for received social support, with exception of the root mean square error for caregivers demanded (RMSE) (0.112). Conclusions: The KWPO can be considered as suitable for measuring social support in cancer-caregivers dyads. It can be used to help Healthcare professionals to assess the patient’s need for social support and caregiver’s competences to provide it.

Abstract

Introduction: Social support is an important mediator between disease and psychological adjustment, both for the patient, as well as for the family members. The aim of the study was to develop the self-reported Patient-Caregiver Social Support Questionnaire (KWPO) and assess the initial reliability and validity of this tool. Material and methods: A total of 102 cancer-caregiver dyads completed the KWPO. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were analyzed. Results: Reliability of the KWPO can be considered satisfactory with a Cronbach’s alpha ranging from 0.89 to 0.923. The mean Content Validity Ratio ranged between 0.85 to 0.92. A four-factor model with the multidimensional aspect of the construct in social support was supported. The fit indices of CFA non-hierarchical model for a flat model was eligible in the goodness of fit index (GFI) (0.943–0.982), the adjusted goodness of fit index (AGFI) (0.921–0.975), the comparative fit index (CFI) (0.703–0.968) and Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) (0.656–0.963) for received social support, with exception of the root mean square error for caregivers demanded (RMSE) (0.112). Conclusions: The KWPO can be considered as suitable for measuring social support in cancer-caregivers dyads. It can be used to help Healthcare professionals to assess the patient’s need for social support and caregiver’s competences to provide it.
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Keywords

informal caregiver, cancer, social support, mental health

About this article
Title

Development of the cancer-patient social support questionnaire: reliability and validity

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 16, No 1 (2019)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

8-15

Published online

2019-01-02

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2019;16(1):8-15.

Keywords

informal caregiver
cancer
social support
mental health

Authors

Katarzyna Sanna
Lidia Cierpiałkowska
Paweł Kleka
Marta Stelmach-Madras
Dariusz Iżycki

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