open access

Vol 15, No 4 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-11-27
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Attachment styles and mental health of adults in general population – pilot study

Cezary Żechowski, Anna Cichocka, Tomasz Rowiński, Kinga Mrozik, Monika Kowalska-Dąbrowska, Iwona Czuma
Psychiatria 2018;15(4):193-198.

open access

Vol 15, No 4 (2018)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2018-11-27

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between attachment styles and the symptoms of
mental disorders in adults in the general population.

Material and methods: A group of 97 people aged 19-30 were examined using GHQ-30 (General Health Questionnaire-
30) and ASQ (Attachment Style Questionnaire).

Results: Relations between symptoms of disorders and attachment styles were verified in the multiple linear regression
model. The anxiety style of attachment was an important predictor of somatic symptoms and disturbed social functioning,
while the safe style was a negative predictor (resilience factor) for depressive symptoms.

Conclusions: The pilot results encourage further research into psychopathological symptoms and attachment in a larger
group of people in the general population and people with mental disorders. These studies could contribute to finding
moderating factors between attachment and symptom, and then to creating models of mental disorders.

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between attachment styles and the symptoms of
mental disorders in adults in the general population.

Material and methods: A group of 97 people aged 19-30 were examined using GHQ-30 (General Health Questionnaire-
30) and ASQ (Attachment Style Questionnaire).

Results: Relations between symptoms of disorders and attachment styles were verified in the multiple linear regression
model. The anxiety style of attachment was an important predictor of somatic symptoms and disturbed social functioning,
while the safe style was a negative predictor (resilience factor) for depressive symptoms.

Conclusions: The pilot results encourage further research into psychopathological symptoms and attachment in a larger
group of people in the general population and people with mental disorders. These studies could contribute to finding
moderating factors between attachment and symptom, and then to creating models of mental disorders.

Get Citation

Keywords

attachment styles, mental health, ASQ, GHQ,

About this article
Title

Attachment styles and mental health of adults in general population – pilot study

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 15, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

193-198

Published online

2018-11-27

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2018;15(4):193-198.

Keywords

attachment styles
mental health
ASQ
GHQ

Authors

Cezary Żechowski
Anna Cichocka
Tomasz Rowiński
Kinga Mrozik
Monika Kowalska-Dąbrowska
Iwona Czuma

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