open access

Vol 15, No 4 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-11-27
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The use of EEG-Neurofeedback in rehabilitation for speech disorders in patients after stroke

Dorota Mroczkowska, Szymon Tyras
Psychiatria 2018;15(4):199-205.

open access

Vol 15, No 4 (2018)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2018-11-27

Abstract

Introduction: Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of cognitive disability, including speech disorders. EEG-Biofeedback training is one of the methods supporting the therapy of adults after ischemic stroke. Material and methods: Study population included 58 ischemic stroke patients, with 40 patients in the neurorehabilitation group and 28 ‘control’ patients. All patients were subject to standard neuropsychological therapy for stroke survivors. The examined group was extra subject to 15 sessions of EEG-NFB trainings. In order to check the effectiveness of the training in speech disorders, the Verbal Fluency Test was used. Results: The study results confirmed the thesis that the EEG-NFB training and neuropsychological therapy improve the verbal fluency in adults after stroke. It was proven that EEG-NFB training affect the degree of improvement verbal fluency better than the neuropsychological therapy used separately. It was also confirmed that the degree of initial verbal fluency disorders suffered by stroke survivors has no significant influence on the degree of change (effectiveness of therapy) resulting from the participants in the EEG-NFB training. Conclusions: The EEG-NFB training may be an effective method supporting the basic therapy of adults after stroke suffering from verbal fluency disorders.

Abstract

Introduction: Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of cognitive disability, including speech disorders. EEG-Biofeedback training is one of the methods supporting the therapy of adults after ischemic stroke. Material and methods: Study population included 58 ischemic stroke patients, with 40 patients in the neurorehabilitation group and 28 ‘control’ patients. All patients were subject to standard neuropsychological therapy for stroke survivors. The examined group was extra subject to 15 sessions of EEG-NFB trainings. In order to check the effectiveness of the training in speech disorders, the Verbal Fluency Test was used. Results: The study results confirmed the thesis that the EEG-NFB training and neuropsychological therapy improve the verbal fluency in adults after stroke. It was proven that EEG-NFB training affect the degree of improvement verbal fluency better than the neuropsychological therapy used separately. It was also confirmed that the degree of initial verbal fluency disorders suffered by stroke survivors has no significant influence on the degree of change (effectiveness of therapy) resulting from the participants in the EEG-NFB training. Conclusions: The EEG-NFB training may be an effective method supporting the basic therapy of adults after stroke suffering from verbal fluency disorders.
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Keywords

stroke, neurofeedback, verbal fluency disorders, cognitive functions

About this article
Title

The use of EEG-Neurofeedback in rehabilitation for speech disorders in patients after stroke

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 15, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

199-205

Published online

2018-11-27

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2018;15(4):199-205.

Keywords

stroke
neurofeedback
verbal fluency disorders
cognitive functions

Authors

Dorota Mroczkowska
Szymon Tyras

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