open access

Vol 15, No 1 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-03-28
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Not only „neurosis”. The level of reported pathological worry versus reported generalized anxiety sympthoms, and primary care consultations. Which phenomenon is more informative?

Jacek Gierus, Anna Mosiołek, Agata Szulc
Psychiatria 2018;15(1):1-6.

open access

Vol 15, No 1 (2018)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2018-03-28

Abstract

Introduction: Presented paper reports results of the panel survey concerning relationship between reported level of
pathological worry, lifetime episodes of generalized anxiety, and selected aspects of primary care consultations.

Material and methods: 251 subjects aged 18–85 were examined with panel survey “researchonline.pl”. The survey
contained questions about criteria of generalized anxiety, selected aspects of primary care consultations and items of
Penn State Worry Questionnaire.

Results: 61% of high worriers report past episodes of generalized anxiety during lifetime, 69% of this group reported
consultations with primary care doctor without confirmed somatic reason, and 74% reported consultations resulted
with “neurosis” or psychological factors as a conclusion.

Conclusions: Pathological worry is concluded to be a maladaptive strategy connected with increase in consulting with
primary care doctors, even when it is not accompanied with clinical symptoms. Its reduction might be seen as goal of
prevention of generalized anxiety and reduction of healthcare costs.

Abstract

Introduction: Presented paper reports results of the panel survey concerning relationship between reported level of
pathological worry, lifetime episodes of generalized anxiety, and selected aspects of primary care consultations.

Material and methods: 251 subjects aged 18–85 were examined with panel survey “researchonline.pl”. The survey
contained questions about criteria of generalized anxiety, selected aspects of primary care consultations and items of
Penn State Worry Questionnaire.

Results: 61% of high worriers report past episodes of generalized anxiety during lifetime, 69% of this group reported
consultations with primary care doctor without confirmed somatic reason, and 74% reported consultations resulted
with “neurosis” or psychological factors as a conclusion.

Conclusions: Pathological worry is concluded to be a maladaptive strategy connected with increase in consulting with
primary care doctors, even when it is not accompanied with clinical symptoms. Its reduction might be seen as goal of
prevention of generalized anxiety and reduction of healthcare costs.

Get Citation

Keywords

generalized anxiety, pathological worry, primary care

About this article
Title

Not only „neurosis”. The level of reported pathological worry versus reported generalized anxiety sympthoms, and primary care consultations. Which phenomenon is more informative?

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 15, No 1 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

1-6

Published online

2018-03-28

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2018;15(1):1-6.

Keywords

generalized anxiety
pathological worry
primary care

Authors

Jacek Gierus
Anna Mosiołek
Agata Szulc

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