open access

Vol 15, No 1 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-03-28
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Considerations of suicidal behaviour in psychiatrically hospitalised patients. A psychological portrait of a suicidal female and male

Tytus Koweszko, Jacek Gierus, Maksym Kosiński, Anna Mosiołek, Agata Szulc
Psychiatria 2018;15(1):7-12.

open access

Vol 15, No 1 (2018)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2018-03-28

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine the psychological and clinical considerations of suicidal behaviour in psychiatrically hospitalised patients. The participants of the study were 154 psychiatrically hospitalised patients, who were examined with the Adjective Check List (ACL) scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), WHOQOL-BREF, C-SSRS, and descriptive questionnaire. The scale results were subject to analysis with the use of Spearman’s rho and the Mann-Whitney U test. The correlation analysis was carried out with reference to the number of earlier suicide attempts and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine intergroup differences depending on the presence or absence of suicidal behaviour over a lifetime and low/high suicide risk determined on the basis of the C-SSRS risk assessment. The authors conducted statistical analyses by the gender of the subjects. The obtained results permitted identification of the psychological variables and clinical features which could predispose to suicidal behaviour. Additionally, the study revealed the risk factors and protective factors which are different for each gender. Based on the obtained data, the researchers created profiles of a potential female and male suicide. A psychological profile of a potential suicide can be a useful tool aiding the psychiatric staff in preventing suicidal behaviour in psychiatrically hospitalised patients. A different profile for males and females shows how important the patient’s gender is as a factor determining the specificity of suicidal risk.

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine the psychological and clinical considerations of suicidal behaviour in psychiatrically hospitalised patients. The participants of the study were 154 psychiatrically hospitalised patients, who were examined with the Adjective Check List (ACL) scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), WHOQOL-BREF, C-SSRS, and descriptive questionnaire. The scale results were subject to analysis with the use of Spearman’s rho and the Mann-Whitney U test. The correlation analysis was carried out with reference to the number of earlier suicide attempts and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine intergroup differences depending on the presence or absence of suicidal behaviour over a lifetime and low/high suicide risk determined on the basis of the C-SSRS risk assessment. The authors conducted statistical analyses by the gender of the subjects. The obtained results permitted identification of the psychological variables and clinical features which could predispose to suicidal behaviour. Additionally, the study revealed the risk factors and protective factors which are different for each gender. Based on the obtained data, the researchers created profiles of a potential female and male suicide. A psychological profile of a potential suicide can be a useful tool aiding the psychiatric staff in preventing suicidal behaviour in psychiatrically hospitalised patients. A different profile for males and females shows how important the patient’s gender is as a factor determining the specificity of suicidal risk.
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Keywords

suicide, gender, psychiatry, risk factors

About this article
Title

Considerations of suicidal behaviour in psychiatrically hospitalised patients. A psychological portrait of a suicidal female and male

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 15, No 1 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

7-12

Published online

2018-03-28

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2018;15(1):7-12.

Keywords

suicide
gender
psychiatry
risk factors

Authors

Tytus Koweszko
Jacek Gierus
Maksym Kosiński
Anna Mosiołek
Agata Szulc

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