open access

Vol 12, No 3 (2015)
Review paper
Get Citation

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of affective disorders. Selected epidemiological data concering the use of omega-3 in the prevention of affective disorders

Jarosław Sobiś, Łukasz Kunert, Mariusz Sołtysik, Magdalena Piegza, Robert Pudlo, Piotr W. Gorczyca
Psychiatria 2015;12(3):147-152.

open access

Vol 12, No 3 (2015)
Prace poglądowe - nadesłane

Abstract

This article is an overview of epidemiological studies suggesting that deficit in dietary-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may make an etiological contribution to mood disorders (major depression, bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorder). Anthropological and epidemiological data indicate that humans evolved on a shore-based diet with abundant seafood and few calories from seed oils. In contrast, typical Western diets are now nearly devoid of adequate seafood and have excessive linoleic acid. Thus, high dietary intakes of omega-6 fatty acids may cause a shift toward the proinflammatory thereby promoting the pathogenesis of many illnesses such as cardiovascular diseases and depression. Safety profile of EPA/DHA have been shown. Risks of exposure to environmental toxins (mercury, dioxins) from large fish consumption are substantially reduced through purification processes used to concentrate fish oil supplements. In the end, authors suggest further research needs to be done to determine the best recommended doses of supplements of omega-3. Limited clinical data with rapidly growing support of laboratory and epidemiological studies, indicate omega-3 fatty acids as may play a role in the prevention and management of depression.

Abstract

This article is an overview of epidemiological studies suggesting that deficit in dietary-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may make an etiological contribution to mood disorders (major depression, bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorder). Anthropological and epidemiological data indicate that humans evolved on a shore-based diet with abundant seafood and few calories from seed oils. In contrast, typical Western diets are now nearly devoid of adequate seafood and have excessive linoleic acid. Thus, high dietary intakes of omega-6 fatty acids may cause a shift toward the proinflammatory thereby promoting the pathogenesis of many illnesses such as cardiovascular diseases and depression. Safety profile of EPA/DHA have been shown. Risks of exposure to environmental toxins (mercury, dioxins) from large fish consumption are substantially reduced through purification processes used to concentrate fish oil supplements. In the end, authors suggest further research needs to be done to determine the best recommended doses of supplements of omega-3. Limited clinical data with rapidly growing support of laboratory and epidemiological studies, indicate omega-3 fatty acids as may play a role in the prevention and management of depression.

Get Citation

Keywords

omega-3, epidemiology, anthropology

About this article
Title

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of affective disorders. Selected epidemiological data concering the use of omega-3 in the prevention of affective disorders

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 12, No 3 (2015)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

147-152

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2015;12(3):147-152.

Keywords

omega-3
epidemiology
anthropology

Authors

Jarosław Sobiś
Łukasz Kunert
Mariusz Sołtysik
Magdalena Piegza
Robert Pudlo
Piotr W. Gorczyca

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Wydawcą serwisu jest Via Medica sp. z o.o. sp. komandytowa, ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl