open access

Vol 3, No 2 (2006)
Research paper
Published online: 2006-08-23
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Clinical and cognitive correlates of schizophasia

Andrzej Czernikiewicz, Daniel Bibułowicz, Dorota Płońska, Tomasz Woźniak
Psychiatria 2006;3(2):55-61.

open access

Vol 3, No 2 (2006)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2006-08-23

Abstract

Background. Language disorders are one of the most important characteristics of schizophrenia. They were formerly described by Bleuler as disorders of association and as formal thoughts disorder in DSM III R. However, there is a large group of schizophrenic patients, who never present typical language disorders, defined by authors (Czernikiewicz, Wozniak) as schizophasia. According to these information, authors try to find out, which clinical symptoms of schizophrenia and cognitive deficits typical for this psychosis correlate with high level of schizophasia.
Material and methods. We assessed linguistic, clinical and cognitive status of 30 patients who fulfilled DSM IV diagnostic criteria of schizpohrenia and DSM III criteria of chronicity. All subjects were divided into two subgroups according to the total score in TLC Scale by Andreasen: 1) Subgroup S with high or extremely high level of thought, language and communication disorders (n = 18) and 2) subgroup N without schizophasia symptoms according to TLC Scale (n = 12). The same battery of psychometric and cognitive measures was used for both groups.
Conclusions. 1. Patients with high or extremely high level of schizophasia had significantly poorer results in: 1) global assessment of mental state (CGI); 2) global assessment of psychosocial functioning (GAF) and 3) all positive symptoms of schizophrenia (SAPS) and four negative symptoms of schizophrenia (except apathy and avolition).
2. Cognitive correlates of insomnia were: executive memory, verbal fluency, auditory and visual memory disorders.

Abstract

Background. Language disorders are one of the most important characteristics of schizophrenia. They were formerly described by Bleuler as disorders of association and as formal thoughts disorder in DSM III R. However, there is a large group of schizophrenic patients, who never present typical language disorders, defined by authors (Czernikiewicz, Wozniak) as schizophasia. According to these information, authors try to find out, which clinical symptoms of schizophrenia and cognitive deficits typical for this psychosis correlate with high level of schizophasia.
Material and methods. We assessed linguistic, clinical and cognitive status of 30 patients who fulfilled DSM IV diagnostic criteria of schizpohrenia and DSM III criteria of chronicity. All subjects were divided into two subgroups according to the total score in TLC Scale by Andreasen: 1) Subgroup S with high or extremely high level of thought, language and communication disorders (n = 18) and 2) subgroup N without schizophasia symptoms according to TLC Scale (n = 12). The same battery of psychometric and cognitive measures was used for both groups.
Conclusions. 1. Patients with high or extremely high level of schizophasia had significantly poorer results in: 1) global assessment of mental state (CGI); 2) global assessment of psychosocial functioning (GAF) and 3) all positive symptoms of schizophrenia (SAPS) and four negative symptoms of schizophrenia (except apathy and avolition).
2. Cognitive correlates of insomnia were: executive memory, verbal fluency, auditory and visual memory disorders.
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Keywords

schizophrenia; language disorders

About this article
Title

Clinical and cognitive correlates of schizophasia

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 3, No 2 (2006)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

55-61

Published online

2006-08-23

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2006;3(2):55-61.

Keywords

schizophrenia
language disorders

Authors

Andrzej Czernikiewicz
Daniel Bibułowicz
Dorota Płońska
Tomasz Woźniak

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