open access

Vol 7, No 4 (2010)
Review paper
Published online: 2010-09-13
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CLOCK genes associated with the pathogenesis of unipolar and bipolar affective disorders

Monika Dmitrzak-Węglarz, Joanna Pawlak
Psychiatria 2010;7(4):151-160.

open access

Vol 7, No 4 (2010)
Prace poglądowe - nadesłane
Published online: 2010-09-13

Abstract

Biological rhythms are cyclic changes of physiologic processes and behavioral activity. Among biological rhythms the circadian rhythm is basic for adaptation of internal processes to external condition of environment. Disturbances of circadian system are present in many diseases, causing disturbances of biological cyclic processes. Biological rhythms changes are essential symptom of affective disorders (among depressed/elevated mood, decreased/ increased activity, fear/irritability). Disturbances of circadian rhythm may be intensive and diverse. We may observe changes of intensity of depressed mood during a day (worsening in the morning and partial getting better in the evening). Till today several genes has been described to be important in pathogenesis of mood disorders. There are 21 identified clock genes. In mammalian, and in human too, most important are genes: PER1, PER2, PER3 and CRY1, CRY2. Studies indicate, that changes in physiological cyclic processes and psychopathological symptoms arise as a result of changes in these genes. One can suppose that bipolar and unipolar disease may be associated with disturbances of circadian clock, at least in some patients. That’s why investigators that look for genetic association of mental disorders indicate candidate genes in clock system. This issue considers with association studies of clock genes in unipolar and bipolar disease.
Psychiatry 2010; 7, 4: 151-160

Abstract

Biological rhythms are cyclic changes of physiologic processes and behavioral activity. Among biological rhythms the circadian rhythm is basic for adaptation of internal processes to external condition of environment. Disturbances of circadian system are present in many diseases, causing disturbances of biological cyclic processes. Biological rhythms changes are essential symptom of affective disorders (among depressed/elevated mood, decreased/ increased activity, fear/irritability). Disturbances of circadian rhythm may be intensive and diverse. We may observe changes of intensity of depressed mood during a day (worsening in the morning and partial getting better in the evening). Till today several genes has been described to be important in pathogenesis of mood disorders. There are 21 identified clock genes. In mammalian, and in human too, most important are genes: PER1, PER2, PER3 and CRY1, CRY2. Studies indicate, that changes in physiological cyclic processes and psychopathological symptoms arise as a result of changes in these genes. One can suppose that bipolar and unipolar disease may be associated with disturbances of circadian clock, at least in some patients. That’s why investigators that look for genetic association of mental disorders indicate candidate genes in clock system. This issue considers with association studies of clock genes in unipolar and bipolar disease.
Psychiatry 2010; 7, 4: 151-160
Get Citation

Keywords

unipolar and bipolar disorders; circadian rhythm; gene; circadian genes; polymorphism

About this article
Title

CLOCK genes associated with the pathogenesis of unipolar and bipolar affective disorders

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 7, No 4 (2010)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

151-160

Published online

2010-09-13

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2010;7(4):151-160.

Keywords

unipolar and bipolar disorders
circadian rhythm
gene
circadian genes
polymorphism

Authors

Monika Dmitrzak-Węglarz
Joanna Pawlak

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