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Vol 7, No 6 (2010)
Review paper
Published online: 2011-02-14
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The genetics of anorexia nervosa: the current status and perspectives for future research

Monika Dmitrzak-Węglarz
Psychiatria 2010;7(6):203-226.

open access

Vol 7, No 6 (2010)
Prace poglądowe - nadesłane
Published online: 2011-02-14

Abstract

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex disorder with the highest range of mortality among psychiatric disorders. Genetic studies on twins and families provided from 12 years suggested a substantial genetic influence for AN. Because there is no straight connection between symptoms and molecular pathology of disease, therefore identification of genes predisposing to disease is difficult. Originally research focused on neurotransmitters genes such as serotonergic and dopaminergic system genes, and genes involved in body weight and food intake regulation. In the next stage meta-analyses with large sample size were used. Also some studies used subphenotypes and strategy of endophenotypes. Unfortunately, results achieved in these studies did not provide unequivocally findings. Currently genome-wide association studies (GWAS) era begins. We hope that GWAS will help to identify genes and pathways involved in eating disorders. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying eating disorders might improve therapeutic approaches. The aim of this paper is summarizing the hitherto genetics association studies in AN and showing perspectives for future research.
Psychiatry 2010; 7, 6: 203–226

Abstract

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex disorder with the highest range of mortality among psychiatric disorders. Genetic studies on twins and families provided from 12 years suggested a substantial genetic influence for AN. Because there is no straight connection between symptoms and molecular pathology of disease, therefore identification of genes predisposing to disease is difficult. Originally research focused on neurotransmitters genes such as serotonergic and dopaminergic system genes, and genes involved in body weight and food intake regulation. In the next stage meta-analyses with large sample size were used. Also some studies used subphenotypes and strategy of endophenotypes. Unfortunately, results achieved in these studies did not provide unequivocally findings. Currently genome-wide association studies (GWAS) era begins. We hope that GWAS will help to identify genes and pathways involved in eating disorders. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying eating disorders might improve therapeutic approaches. The aim of this paper is summarizing the hitherto genetics association studies in AN and showing perspectives for future research.
Psychiatry 2010; 7, 6: 203–226
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Keywords

anorexia nervosa; molecular genetics; gene; polymorphism

About this article
Title

The genetics of anorexia nervosa: the current status and perspectives for future research

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 7, No 6 (2010)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

203-226

Published online

2011-02-14

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2010;7(6):203-226.

Keywords

anorexia nervosa
molecular genetics
gene
polymorphism

Authors

Monika Dmitrzak-Węglarz

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