open access

Vol 17, No 2 (2014)
Original articles
Published online: 2014-07-30
Submitted: 2013-12-09
Accepted: 2014-05-28
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Automated quantification with BRASS reduces equivocal reporting of DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT) SPECT studies

Deborah Ruth Pencharz, Paul Hanlon, Riddhika Chakravartty, Shaunak Navalkissoor, Ann-Marie Quigley, Thomas Wagner, Thomas Wagner
DOI: 10.5603/NMR.2014.0019
·
Nucl. Med. Rev 2014;17(2):65-69.

open access

Vol 17, No 2 (2014)
Original articles
Published online: 2014-07-30
Submitted: 2013-12-09
Accepted: 2014-05-28

Abstract

BACKGROUND: 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT studies of the nigrostriatal pathway are a valuable tool in the diagnosis of movement disorders. However some scans are reported as equivocal with potential adverse consequences. We investigated whether the use of quantification of tracer uptake within the striatum can be used to reduce the number of equivocal reports.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: BRASS software (Hermes, Sweden) was used to quantify striatal tracer uptake in DaTSCAN studies of patients referred to our institution. Scans were quantified and numerical limits were determined to distinguish between normal and abnormal scans. Scans were then re-reported both with, and without, the use of quantification. Number of equivocal reports and accuracy of reporting between the two types of reporting were compared.

RESULTS: Scan reporting using quantification led to a significant reduction in the number of equivocal reports with no significant change in reporting accuracy.

CONCLUSION: Automated quantification of DaTSCAN studies with BRASS and the use of numerical limits can decrease the number of equivocal reports without affecting report accuracy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT studies of the nigrostriatal pathway are a valuable tool in the diagnosis of movement disorders. However some scans are reported as equivocal with potential adverse consequences. We investigated whether the use of quantification of tracer uptake within the striatum can be used to reduce the number of equivocal reports.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: BRASS software (Hermes, Sweden) was used to quantify striatal tracer uptake in DaTSCAN studies of patients referred to our institution. Scans were quantified and numerical limits were determined to distinguish between normal and abnormal scans. Scans were then re-reported both with, and without, the use of quantification. Number of equivocal reports and accuracy of reporting between the two types of reporting were compared.

RESULTS: Scan reporting using quantification led to a significant reduction in the number of equivocal reports with no significant change in reporting accuracy.

CONCLUSION: Automated quantification of DaTSCAN studies with BRASS and the use of numerical limits can decrease the number of equivocal reports without affecting report accuracy.
Get Citation

Keywords

DaTSCAN, quantification, Parkinson’s disease, diagnosis

About this article
Title

Automated quantification with BRASS reduces equivocal reporting of DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT) SPECT studies

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 17, No 2 (2014)

Pages

65-69

Published online

2014-07-30

DOI

10.5603/NMR.2014.0019

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2014;17(2):65-69.

Keywords

DaTSCAN
quantification
Parkinson’s disease
diagnosis

Authors

Deborah Ruth Pencharz
Paul Hanlon
Riddhika Chakravartty
Shaunak Navalkissoor
Ann-Marie Quigley
Thomas Wagner
Thomas Wagner

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