open access

Vol 8, No 1 (2005)
Lecture
Published online: 2005-06-21
Submitted: 2012-01-23
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12th European Symposium on Radiopharmacy and Radiopharmaceuticals, 9–11th September, 2004, Gdańsk–Sopot — an update. Lecture: W. Kamysz, Are antimicrobial peptides an alternative for conventional antibiotics?

Wojciech Kamysz
Nucl. Med. Rev 2005;8(1):78-86.

open access

Vol 8, No 1 (2005)
Lecture
Published online: 2005-06-21
Submitted: 2012-01-23

Abstract

Antimicrobial peptides are widespread in living organisms and constitute an important component of innate immunity to microbial infections. By the early 1980s, more than 800 different antimicrobial peptides had been isolated from mammals, amphibians, fish, insects, plants and bacterial species. In humans, they are produced by granulocytes, macrophages and most epithelial and endothelial cells. Newly discovered antibiotics have antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and even antiprotozoal activity. Occasionally, a single antibiotic may have a very wide spectrum of activity and may show activity towards various kinds of microorganisms. Although antimicrobial activity is the most typical function of peptides, they are also characterized by numerous other properties. They stimulate the immune system, have anti-neoplastic properties and participate in cell signalling and proliferation regulation. As antimicrobial peptides from higher eukaryotes differ structurally from conventional antibiotics produced by bacteria and fungi, they offer novel templates for pharmaceutical compounds, which could be used effectively against the increasing number of resistant microbes.

Abstract

Antimicrobial peptides are widespread in living organisms and constitute an important component of innate immunity to microbial infections. By the early 1980s, more than 800 different antimicrobial peptides had been isolated from mammals, amphibians, fish, insects, plants and bacterial species. In humans, they are produced by granulocytes, macrophages and most epithelial and endothelial cells. Newly discovered antibiotics have antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and even antiprotozoal activity. Occasionally, a single antibiotic may have a very wide spectrum of activity and may show activity towards various kinds of microorganisms. Although antimicrobial activity is the most typical function of peptides, they are also characterized by numerous other properties. They stimulate the immune system, have anti-neoplastic properties and participate in cell signalling and proliferation regulation. As antimicrobial peptides from higher eukaryotes differ structurally from conventional antibiotics produced by bacteria and fungi, they offer novel templates for pharmaceutical compounds, which could be used effectively against the increasing number of resistant microbes.
Get Citation

Keywords

antimicrobial peptides; peptide antibiotics

About this article
Title

12th European Symposium on Radiopharmacy and Radiopharmaceuticals, 9–11th September, 2004, Gdańsk–Sopot — an update. Lecture: W. Kamysz, Are antimicrobial peptides an alternative for conventional antibiotics?

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 8, No 1 (2005)

Pages

78-86

Published online

2005-06-21

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2005;8(1):78-86.

Keywords

antimicrobial peptides
peptide antibiotics

Authors

Wojciech Kamysz

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