open access

Vol 9, No 1 (2006)
Basic sciences
Published online: 2006-01-25
Submitted: 2012-01-23
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Small animal imaging using a conventional gamma camera exemplified in studies on the striatal dopaminergic system

Christoph Scherfler, Clemens Decristoforo
Nucl. Med. Rev 2006;9(1):6-11.

open access

Vol 9, No 1 (2006)
Basic sciences
Published online: 2006-01-25
Submitted: 2012-01-23

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Small animal imaging has recently been the subject of increasing interest and specific imaging devices in particular for positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed. To bypass limitations arising from high acquisition costs and dependence on an in-house cyclotron unit inevitably associated with PET, a conventional gamma camera has been equipped with a pinhole collimator and used to visualize striatal pre- and post-synaptic dopaminergic function in rats measured by the dopamine transporter ligand [123I]β-CIT and the dopamine D2/dopamine D3 receptor ligand [123I]IBZM. In order to precisely estimate brain regions of low radioligand uptake, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were coregistered onto an MRI template.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our pinhole SPECT/MRI approach has been employed in animal models of pre- and postsynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction. The physical characteristics of the scanner, the tracer kinetics and modelling as well as image postprocessing have been addressed and associated intrinsic problems and constraints discussed.
CONCLUSIONS: An outlook has been provided on the application of pinhole SPECT and MRI coregistration towards non-invasive investigations of drug-receptor interactions and binding characteristics of newly developed radiopharmaceuticals.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Small animal imaging has recently been the subject of increasing interest and specific imaging devices in particular for positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed. To bypass limitations arising from high acquisition costs and dependence on an in-house cyclotron unit inevitably associated with PET, a conventional gamma camera has been equipped with a pinhole collimator and used to visualize striatal pre- and post-synaptic dopaminergic function in rats measured by the dopamine transporter ligand [123I]β-CIT and the dopamine D2/dopamine D3 receptor ligand [123I]IBZM. In order to precisely estimate brain regions of low radioligand uptake, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were coregistered onto an MRI template.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our pinhole SPECT/MRI approach has been employed in animal models of pre- and postsynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction. The physical characteristics of the scanner, the tracer kinetics and modelling as well as image postprocessing have been addressed and associated intrinsic problems and constraints discussed.
CONCLUSIONS: An outlook has been provided on the application of pinhole SPECT and MRI coregistration towards non-invasive investigations of drug-receptor interactions and binding characteristics of newly developed radiopharmaceuticals.
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Keywords

pinhole SPECT; MRI; coregistration; dopamine transporter; dopamine D2/D3 receptor; striatum

About this article
Title

Small animal imaging using a conventional gamma camera exemplified in studies on the striatal dopaminergic system

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 9, No 1 (2006)

Pages

6-11

Published online

2006-01-25

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2006;9(1):6-11.

Keywords

pinhole SPECT
MRI
coregistration
dopamine transporter
dopamine D2/D3 receptor
striatum

Authors

Christoph Scherfler
Clemens Decristoforo

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