open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Review paper
Published online: 2022-04-15
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Immunological aspects of heat shock protein functions and their significance in the development of cancer vaccines

Iryna Boliukh1, Agnieszka Rombel-Bryzek1, Barbara Radecka23
DOI: 10.5603/NJO.a2022.0024
·
Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):174-183.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Opole, Opole, Poland
  2. Department of Oncology, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Opole, Opole, Poland
  3. Department of Clinical Oncology, Tadeusz Koszarowski Cancer Centre in Opole, Opole, Poland

open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Review article
Published online: 2022-04-15

Abstract

The primary function of intracellular heat shock proteins (HSPs) is to protect the cell by suppressing the effects of va­rious stress factors by either refolding misfolded proteins or blocking apoptosis. After neoplastic transformation, cells overexpress HSPs, which act as factors promoting the neoplastic process by stabilizing proteins responsible for carci­nogenesis, however, HSPs can be released into the extracellular environment where they act as important modulators of the immune response. In a tumor microenvironment, extracellular HSPs are able to induce a pro- or anti-neoplastic response, using various mechanisms of affecting immune cells, The study of the role of extracellular HSPs in immuno­modulation processes is a very important direction in the search for new methods of cancer treatment. This review summarizes reports on the use of HSPs in immunotherapeutic cancer strategies, in particular in cancer vaccine design.

Abstract

The primary function of intracellular heat shock proteins (HSPs) is to protect the cell by suppressing the effects of va­rious stress factors by either refolding misfolded proteins or blocking apoptosis. After neoplastic transformation, cells overexpress HSPs, which act as factors promoting the neoplastic process by stabilizing proteins responsible for carci­nogenesis, however, HSPs can be released into the extracellular environment where they act as important modulators of the immune response. In a tumor microenvironment, extracellular HSPs are able to induce a pro- or anti-neoplastic response, using various mechanisms of affecting immune cells, The study of the role of extracellular HSPs in immuno­modulation processes is a very important direction in the search for new methods of cancer treatment. This review summarizes reports on the use of HSPs in immunotherapeutic cancer strategies, in particular in cancer vaccine design.

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Keywords

heat shock proteins; cancer immunotherapy; vaccine

About this article
Title

Immunological aspects of heat shock protein functions and their significance in the development of cancer vaccines

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

174-183

Published online

2022-04-15

Page views

44

Article views/downloads

22

DOI

10.5603/NJO.a2022.0024

Bibliographic record

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):174-183.

Keywords

heat shock proteins
cancer immunotherapy
vaccine

Authors

Iryna Boliukh
Agnieszka Rombel-Bryzek
Barbara Radecka

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